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Check out easy and practical recipes with baru nuts

 

 

Brigadeiro de baru. Photo: Lula Lopes / Collection Cajuí Digital Communication

Brigadeiro de baru 

By chef Eliane Regis 

Ingredients

400g condensed milk 

200g of fresh cream 

3 tablespoons of baru flour 

2 tablespoons of butter at room temperature 

Baru nut flour to sprinkle the brigadeiros 

Butter for greasing

Preparation mode

Baru flour 

To be made into flour, the baru nut must be roasted. Remove the shell and beat the almonds in a blender or processor. 

Brigadier

In a saucepan, place the condensed milk, baru flour, sour cream and butter. Mix well and bring to a low heat, stirring constantly until it comes off the bottom of the pan for about 10 minutes. Remove it from the heat, transfer the contents to a buttered dish and let it cool. Grease your hands with butter, make spheres and finish with baru flour.

Baru paçoca. Photo: Raimundo Sampaio / Cajuí Digital Communication Collection

Paçoca de baru

By Cerrado Pitadas 

Ingredients

80g of baru nut

20g of cassava flour

40g of honey

10g of water

Preparation mode

Beat the peeled baru nut in a blender until it turns into flour. Reserve. Then, beat the cassava flour in a blender until it reaches a very fine consistency. Reserve.

Mix the two flours with the honey and water until it becomes a homogeneous mixture. Reserve 5g of the mixture for finishing. Make 10g balls (as if they were brigadeiros) and pass them in this mixture. If you want it more loose, pass it through a sieve (as in the photo).

Baru kid's foot. Photo: Thamirys Andrade / Cajuí Digital Communication Collection

Baru brat's foot 

By Thamyris Andrade

Ingredients

. 300g (2 cups) sugar 

. 600ml (6 tablespoons) of water 

. Roasted and lightly chopped baru nuts 

Preparation mode 

Bring the water and sugar to a fire in a saucepan. Stir the mixture until it caramelizes and reaches the wire point. Add the chestnut and stir well to incorporate it into the syrup. Pour the mixture over the marble stone (or aluminum form). Wait for 1 minute to cool and cut the candy into squares. 

 

Kalungas use digital mapping to defend their territory

per  on 25 March 2021 | Translated by Carol De Marchi and André Cherri via Mongabay Brazil

 

  • For the first time in 300 years, the largest remaining quilombo in Brazil mapped the occupation and natural resources of its territory through georeferencing.
  • Only half of the Kalunga territory has been officially titled; the rest live at the mercy of garimpeiros and land grabbers - digital mapping will help the community to recognize areas subject to invasion.
  • In February, the United Nations Environment Program recognized the Kalunga territory as the first in Brazil to join the network of Territories and Areas Conserved by Indigenous and Local Communities (TICCA).

 

For the first time in 300 years, the largest remaining quilombo in Brazil knows every inch of its territory. Thanks to an unprecedented georeferencing project, the Kalungas were able to map occupation, natural resources, the best land for cultivation and areas under threat of invasions of the 262 thousand hectares of the area where they live, in the north of Goiás.

Dirani Francisco Maia, from the community of Vão de Almas, with his rice harvest. Photo: Sergio Amaral / MDS

Located close to the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park, the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage it occupies a stretch of Cerrado known for its great biodiversity and abundance of natural resources - the Kalunga territory has no less than 879 springs, most of which flow into the Paranã River, one of the tributaries of the Tocantins River.

“We now have an important tool for the management and protection of our territory. It will help us to plan our future ”, says Jorge Oliveira, president of the Quilombola Kalunga Association (AQK).

The Kalungas had their lands officially recognized as quilombola territory in 1996, but only 55.3% of the area has been titled so far. This opens space for the rest of the quilombo to be invaded by gold miners in search of gold and semi-precious stones and by land grabbers, who have been illegally clearing native vegetation to cultivate on Kalunga lands.

Community leaders say that grileiros often register 5 hectares of land outside the territory and then use this legal basis to create a 700 hectare farm, much of which invades the quilombo.

Map to know and protect

To find out which lands could be used for agriculture and which would need protection to defend against current and future invasions, the Kalungas carried out the proper registration and classification of their resources via georeferencing - or digital mapping. The practice consists of using aerial imagery to map a wide variety of soil characteristics with extreme precision using a geographic coordinate system.

Extremely expensive due to the size of the territory, the prospect of aid for mapping became even more discouraging with the election of President Jair Bolsonaro, who has been expressing hostility towards the quilombola people since before the presidential election, arguing that “Even for a breeder he’s no longer useful”.

Before Bolsonaro's election, the Kalungas received an important grant from the Partnership Fund for Critical Ecosystems (CEPF), which is supported by the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, the Global Environment Facility, the government of Japan and the World Bank. CEPF, created in 2000, aims to promote the conservation of high priority biological areas. In 2018, the quilombola Kalunga Association (AQK) georeferencing project was selected for the program, becoming one of the 60 proposals of its kind in the Cerrado.

The digital mapping allowed the Kalungas to accurately trace the abundance of springs in their territory. Source: AQK.

CEPF Grants Director Peggy Poncelet explains why AQK was selected: “It is very difficult for traditional communities to obtain recognition of their territories, leaving them vulnerable to land grabbing. And because this community is committed to the conservation of the incredible biodiversity found on their land, it was important for CEPF to provide them with the means to continue doing just that ”.

Equipped with equipment and technical support, the Kalungas carried out a detailed georeferencing of your entire territory between 2019 and 2021. Thanks to digital mapping, they now know exactly where the 1,600 families in the area live, what they produce, if they have access to electricity, the degree of preservation of the community's water and soil resources, what type of agriculture is suitable for the land, and much more.

CEPF also finances the Kalungas in their educational efforts, building an environmental awareness in the region, particularly with regard to the 19 threatened species of fauna and flora that are in the territory. Among them are Griffinia nocturna, a plant that blooms at night, and two birds: the brown-bellied jacu (Penelope ochrogaster) and the gray eagle (Harpyhaliaetus coronatus).

Wave of invasions

The Kalungas hope that the georeferencing project will serve as a valuable tool to help them deter the newest wave of invaders.

Oliveira, from AQK, tells how he was the target of violence in 2015: “They knocked down my house and then burned it, along with my fields, destroying the 45 bags of rice that we had already harvested”. Oliveira, his wife and eight children spent two years working to recover lost crops. No one has been charged with the crime, and the attacks on the Kalungas continue. In February, a house in the community of Vão de Almas was demolished with a chainsaw.

Buriti fruits, a native species from the Cerrado collected by the Kalungas. Photo: Elder Miranda Jr./AQK.

Grileiros are also destroying the native flora of the Cerrado, from which the Kalungas extract fruits such as buriti, mangaba, cajuzinho do cerrado, pequi and nut of baru as a complement to their subsistence. “It is exactly these areas, rich in edible fruits and medicinal herbs, that [the invaders] are paving the way for monocultures”says Oliveira.

In June 2020, grileiros cleared 500 hectares of native vegetation to plant soybeans within the quilombo. They used the chain system, in which a chain is suspended between two tractors that advance, knocking down everything they find along the way. This model is widely condemned for its environmental damage, but the chains are easily found for purchase on the internet, with several videos showing how they are used.

The Kalungas filed a complaint of land theft to state authorities, who at the time were concerned about the possibility of an international boycott of Brazilian commodities due to the increase in fires and deforestation in the Cerrado and the Amazon. The authorities investigated the land grabbing and imposed a fine of 5 million reais on the criminals, in addition to acting against illegal mining in the quilombo and seizing equipment from the miners. Still, invaders continue to arrive in Kalunga territory.

Territories for Life

The Kalungas are resisting these invasions with increasing confidence and with increasing international support. In early February, the UN Conservation Monitoring Center for the UN Environment Program (UNEP-WCMC) recognized the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage as the first TICCA (Territories and Areas Conserved by Indigenous and Local Communities) in Brazil.

This title is only granted to well-preserved traditional territories in which communities maintain a deep connection with the place where they live, practice effective internal land management and governance processes and have a good record in promoting the well-being of the people — creating the that UNEP-WCMC calls “Territories for Life”.

Rio da Prata waterfall, identified with potential for future ecotourism attraction. Photo: Elder Miranda Jr./AQK.

Rafaela Nicola, coordinator of the TICCA Consortium and director of Wetlands International in Brazil, describes the first step to winning the title: “What is different about our process is that the communities themselves, during meetings where they discuss the tools they use for empowerment and territorial planning, work on the question of how to become a TICCA would fit in with their visions. "

The application for recognition of a community is then reviewed not by bureaucrats, but by leaders of traditional territories already recognized as TICCAs, to assess whether the candidate fulfills the requirements.

Oliveira, president of AQK, believes that TICCA recognition will also help to convince young people to stay in the quilombo. "Today many leave to study and do not return because they want the security of the right to land and more opportunities to increase their incomes."

At the moment, the quilombo's small cash income comes almost entirely from a single sustainable tourism project, administered by only one of the communities. During the holiday season in the dry season, the Engenho II community, in the municipality of Cavalcante, receives tourists in search of the numerous waterfalls in the region.

The activity, suspended during the covid-19 pandemic, provided an income to 300 guides from different communities, all trained by AQK, while promoting the sale of community crafts and Cerrado products.

The completion of the Kalunga digital mapping project paved the way for tourism in the future by identifying 69 other natural attractions with the potential to be promoted after consultation with communities.

Other benefits brought by georeferencing are greater knowledge of the region's soils and its natural fertility, as well as a better understanding of the topography and availability of water, resulting in a more efficient use of the land. The adoption of appropriate technology will bring higher agricultural yields without the degradation of the territory's natural resources.

Access the article in the website from Mongabay Brazil.


About the Quilombo Kalunga Association and the Partnership Fund for Critical Ecosystems (CEPF Cerrado)

The Quilombo Kalunga Association is a civil organization, with no economic purpose, founded in October 1999. It represents the largest quilombo territory in Brazil, with 262 thousand hectares of land. AQK defends the interests of residents of the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage (SHPCK), which covers the municipalities of Goiás, Cavalcante, Monte Alegre de Goiás and Teresina de Goiás.

The project, sponsored by CEPF and supported by the International Education Institute of Brazil (IEB)aims to get to know the reality of the Kalunga communities in depth, use geoprocessing technology to map the territory in detail, promote the occupation of the SHPCK in a more sustainable way and make the Kalunga internationally recognized as defenders of biodiversity conservation.

For more information about the Quilombo Kalunga Association access the official page on Facebook.


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

Kalunga Territory is recognized by the UN Environmental Program as the first TICCA in Brazil

The UN Environmental Program (UNEP-WCMC) concluded this Tuesday (3) the official registration of the Kalunga Historical and Cultural Heritage Site as the first TICCA (Territories and Areas Conserved by Indigenous and Local Communities) in Brazil.

Access the publication here: https://www.protectedplanet.net/555698070

 

By Maiana Diniz, Communication Advisor, via the Quilombo Kalunga Association

The global title is assigned to conserved community and traditional territories in which the community has a deep connection with the place it inhabits, internal management and governance processes and positive results in nature conservation, as well as the well-being of its people, the so-called “territories of life”.

Jorge Moreira de Oliveira, president of the Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK) & #8211; Photo: Elder Miranda Jr / AQK

“It is with great pride that we received the news that the Kalunga Territory, one of the largest in Brazil, has been recognized by the UN as TICCA, as a preserved territory. This means that here we still have many fruits, a lot of nature and many preserved beauties. As a representative, I am honored with this international recognition. I believe that now we will have more partners to help us in the fight for the conquest of our entire territory, which has not yet been entirely expropriated. ”, celebrates the president of Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK), Jorge Moreira de Oliveira.

Family farmer Kalunga de Monte Alegre & #8211; Photo: Elder Miranda Jr / AQK

With a strong tradition in agriculture, the Kalunga people practice low carbon planting and rely on ancestral knowledge to plant at the pace of nature, eliminating the use of pesticides. They plant in small fields, usually smaller than 1 hectare, where they practice subsistence agriculture, with the sale of surpluses. The cultivated areas are used for up to 4 years, then rest for 10 years. The gardens are made in the hoe, without the use of machines. The Kalunga they also practice extractivism and seek other sustainable alternatives for the development of the territory.

Becoming TICCA is a global recognition the role of the Kalunga people in conserving the biodiversity of the Cerrado and the beauty of Chapada dos Veadeiros, in northeastern Goiás. Rich in culture, water and biodiversity, it is estimated that the Kalunga quilombo was created more than 300 years ago by people who did not accept and managed to escape the slavery regime of the time. The territory occupies an area of 261 thousand hectares in the municipalities of Cavalcante, Teresina de Goiás and Monte Alegre, all located in the state of Goiás.

“We have gained autonomy in the management of our land. Now that we are listed on the international map of traditional communities as TICCA, we hope to join in this struggle with other communities around the world ”, says Damião Moreira Santos, project coordinator for the Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK).

Vão do Moleque Lookout, at the Kalunga Historical and Cultural Heritage Site & #8211; Photo: Maiana Diniz / AQK

In addition, the title is expected to assist in protection of the territory against external threats, because now the Kalunga have in their hands a United Nations validation that proves the conservation in the territory, besides adding even more value to the community-based tourism and products from those regions.

The register

The suggestion that the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage (SHPCK) fit the TICCA concept came from the Director of Grant of the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF), Peggy Poncelet, throughout the process of building the Internal Rules of the Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK), a document that establishes clear rules for the management and use of land by the Kalunga people. CEPF has a ongoing project with AQK and in the last two years has financed several actions for the improving management and sustainable development in the territory.

The board of the Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK) became interested in the concept and throughout the community assemblies to discuss the Internal Regulations it also started an intense process of dialogues and consultations with the residents of the 39 communities living in the territory on the challenges and advantages to become TICCA.

“It was a very participatory process. We have a preserved community, a territory of life, but we suffer constant invasions. The TICCA formalization process has helped us to give international visibility to protect us ”, evaluates Vilmar Kalunga.

Mirante da Comunidade Vão de Almas, one of the 39 in Kalunga territory & #8211; Photo: Elder Miranda Jr / AQK

Were 14 large community assemblies and a large 3-day assembly to discuss and approve the Internal Regulations, a process that took place under the leadership of Vilmar Kalunga, then president of AQK, Damião Moreira dos Santos, coordinator of the CEPF project at AQK, Durval Fernandes Motta, consultant of the Association, and Jorge Moreira de Oliveira, current president of AQK.

“In the assemblies, we try to show the community the importance of the work that we all do for the world in relation to the preservation and conservation of nature. We, even without knowing or being recognized, provide a global service to the environment. During the discussions, we regained our awareness and pride in how we live and make a living from the environment. ”, recalls Damião Moreira.

The Community decision to proclaim itself as the first TICCA in Brazil it took place during a general meeting in February 2020. This was the first step towards the recognition of the Kalunga territory as “#8220; territory of life”, or TICCA.

Throughout the process, the AQK team had the active support of Partnership Fund for Critical Ecosystems (CEPF) and the International Education Institute of Brazil (IEB).

“We support territorial management, as we realize that it is very important from the point of view of conservation. AQK went deep with the project. We follow their territorial management steps: reviewing the statute, mapping their natural resources and managing conflicts in the community ”, explains Michael Becker, CEPF Cerrado coordinator.

AQK also contacted the Mupan (Women in Action in the Pantanal), institution that is the focal point of the TICCA Consortium in Brazil. In addition to clarifying doubts, Mupan supported the process of finalizing the registration of the SHPCK at the World Conservation Monitoring Center (WCMC) and created a Brazilian protocol to carry out the peer review process, provided for in the UN requirements to grant the title.

“Mupan helped in the articulation with other institutions and in the evaluation letter. As there were no other TICCAs in Brazil to do the recognition, we set up a commission for the TICCA Brasil network with quilombo leaders, representatives of the black movement and the Rede Cerrado institution, to certify if the procedure in the Kalunga territory had occurred in accordance with the documents sent to UNEP ”says Lílian Ribeiro, coordinator of indigenous affairs and traditional communities of the Corredor Azul Program, Mupan. Lilian also points out that the title is an additional tool for the Kalunga community to gain strength in the defense of the territory.

Maiana Diniz, AQK Communication Advisor
Whatsapp: (61) 98400.2100


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

In a virtual meeting with collectors, RSC and Associação Cerrado de Pé define price and collection potential for 2021

by Maria Antônia Perdigão, via the Cerrado Seed Network 

In a workshop held on Tuesday, 26, the Cerrado Seed Network (RSC) and the Cerrado Standing Association brought together collectors and the Project's technical team Seed and Catering Market: Promoting Environmental Services and Biodiversity to prepare the action plan for 2021. The meeting took place virtually and was attended by the consultant Regina Erismamm.

Besides the review of seed prices available for sale by the Association through RSC, the potential for collection and the benefits of processing native seeds from the Cerrado, which are used in the biome restoration process through direct sowing, were also discussed during the meeting.

Photo: ©Amalia Robredo/CSR Collection

On the occasion, the collectors themselves defined the prices of the species that will be marketed in 2021. “Every beginning of the year, the Cerrado Seed Network conducts this workshop with the collectors so that they can define the price and the collection potential. This definition takes into account several aspects such as, for example, the processing of seeds. It is important to note that the Association has been delivering purer seeds that provide better results in restoration. This ends up making the process more laborious and a little more expensive. Due to the experiences of previous years, the price of some species needed to be revised for 2021 ”, pondered the President of RSC, Camila Motta.

The seed processing will continue to be prioritized by Associação Cerrado de Pé, as President Claudomiro de Almeida said. “We have some species that are very complex to benefit and require a lot of work. We set the price taking into account the collector's effort and also the advantages for the customer who will receive the seeds with more quality ”, he highlighted.

On the occasion, Claudomiro announced that the Association is offering the service of ecological restoration. "This is very good, because in addition to allowing the collector to participate in the restoration of degraded areas, it generates another income supplement", completed.

The project

The sale of native seeds from the Cerrado is an initiative of CSR through the Project Seed and Catering Market: Promoting Environmental Services and Biodiversity which has the support of the Partnership Fund for Critical Ecosystems (CEPF), International Institute of Education of Brazil and Caixa Seguradora Institute. Used in ecological restoration by the method of planting direct sowing, these seeds are collected by small rural, settled and quilombola producers who are part of the Cerrado de Pé Association.

Maria Antônia Perdigão- (61) 98327-3415
Communication Advisory for the Cerrado Seed Network

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

Beekeeping course for quilombolas Kalunga has a reserve of 50% of vacancies for women

Initiative of the Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK), Tiradentes Institute (IE) and CEPF Cerrado / IEB, the beekeeping course moved 16 young quilombolas Kalunga, from October 26 to 30, in the city of Niquelândia, in Goiás

by Luana Luizy, Communication Officer, International Education Institute of Brazil

 

The search for a diversified agroextractive economy led to the idea of carrying out this training with young Kalunga quilombolas. Photo: Manuel Júnior / Collection Instituto Educacional Tiradentes

The search for a agroextractive economy diversified led to the idea of carrying out this training, since the quilombolas Kalunga they are suffering impacts from the pandemic, as one of the main ways of generating income for quilombolas is tourism in the region.

 The course left as result the construction of eight apiaries with small honey extraction units. The initiative sought to generate autonomy for quilombolas, who are in isolated areas and difficult to access to the community, where electricity, until today, does not exist.

“Honey is a product that you can keep for up to two years; it cannot be refrigerated, otherwise it will spoil. This project came to serve communities abandoned by the government ”explains Manoel Júnior, from the Tiradentes Institute.

Training - which seeks to train young multipliers - destined 50% of vacancies for women, prioritizing gender equity, as a way to promote income autonomy for this group. Sirleia Torres, 28, says that training is very important for her to find financial opportunities.

“Now I am going to expand my possibilities in the job market. Every day I learn more about beekeeping; it's been an incredible experience ”, says the young quilombola.

“Gender inequality is a reality within these communities. It is the woman who organizes the house and the plantations, but the income remains with the men. So, this course prioritizes that they can have more autonomy ”, says Manuel.

About the Quilombo Kalunga Association and CEPF Cerrado

The Quilombo Kalunga Association is a civil organization, with no economic purpose, founded in October 1999. It represents the largest quilombo territory in Brazil, with 262 thousand hectares of land. AQK defends the interests of residents of the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage (SHPCK), which covers the municipalities of Goiás, Cavalcante, Monte Alegre de Goiás and Teresina de Goiás.

The project, promoted by Partnership Fund for Critical Ecosystems (CEPF Cerrado) and with support from International Institute of Education of Brazilaims to get to know the reality of the Kalunga communities in depth, use geoprocessing technology to map the territory in detail, promote the occupation of the SHPCK in a more sustainable way and make the Kalunga internationally recognized as defenders of biodiversity conservation.

 

Learn more about AQK: http://quilombokalunga.org.br/PKS/?page_id=27

Learn more about the Tiradentes Educational Institute: https://institutotiradentes.com.br/


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

For an isolated community in Brazil, knowledge is power

The Kalunga community is using mapping data to defend their land and traditional way of life.

translated from text published by Marsea Nelson, Senior Communications Manager, Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund 

 

Several hundred years ago, in Brazil, fugitive slave groups established communities & #8211; known as quilombos. Many of these communities were destroyed, but in a remote mountainous region of Goiás, some 8,000 of their descendants & #8211; the people Kalunga & #8211; it continues a traditional lifestyle largely isolated from the modern world.

Today, however, this modern world is forming for this community. The Kalungas found themselves fighting for both their culture and their ancestral land, which lies within the impressive region of Veadeiros Plateau (Goiás, Brazil), which is part of hot spot in Cerrado biodiversity.

The Kalunga are mainly Catholic. However, some converted to neo-Pentecostalism, which brought some differences with community members who continue to hold traditional beliefs.

Community children learn about local biodiversity. Photo: © Quilombo Kalunga Association Collection

In addition, younger Kalungas leave the territory to study or work. “When they return, they bring musical influences, outside dancing and new habits,” said Vilmar Souza Costa, president of the Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK). “They also bring a new vision of how to relate to the land, wanting to apply new technologies to cultivate it and fight pests, which are more appropriate for agribusiness.”

At threats to Kalunga lands they include imminent plans for the construction of a small hydroelectric plant and consistent pressure from mining companies, as well as an increase in land used for agriculture.

Pasture areas have grown over the years and open areas are already taking over the territory, Costa said. He also noted that populations of many species of local biodiversity & #8211; including tapirs, armadillos, rheas and fish & #8211; decreased.

The project field team. Photo: © Quilombo Kalunga Association Collection

Recognizing these challenges, the community established the Quilombo Kalunga Association in 1999 to represent and defend their interests.

In 2013, the idea of using the geoprocessing to better understand families living in the region and territory, documenting precisely what Kalunga lands housed, where they were most vulnerable and where there were the best opportunities to implement tourism.

Finding funding for the project, however, proved challenging. Government funds failed and efforts to find another donor did not materialize until five years later, when CEPF granted the Association its first Donation of US$ 216,600.00.

& #8220; In the Cerrado, working with traditional peoples and communities is an important part of our strategy & #8221; said Peggy Poncelet, CEPF grant director. #8220; Not every donor is equipped to provide the kind of technical support that a developing organization such as AQK requires, but CEPF is.

Kalunga Territory. Photo: ©P. Poncelet / CEPF Collection

With funding finally in place, a specialist was hired by AQK to train 24 young Kalungas in GIS and Open Data Kit, which is a data collection toolkit that does not require an internet connection. They then began to systematically gather socioeconomic information about local residents of the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage.

The work was not easy & #8211; The team faced heavy rains and bad roads. Sometimes they would go to hard to reach places, only to find that the family was not at home. This fieldwork was a complicated process, but, according to Costa, the young people took on with “enthusiasm and joy”.

The information collected in the survey is being useful on many fronts. The state sanitation company will use the data to improve water supply and sanitation in the community. Information about which families have dogs and chickens will be used by the Department of Health to help fight Chagas disease, which can cause serious health complications. Meanwhile, a federal organization is using data on land cultivation and animal husbandry to provide farmers with more efficient technical assistance.

Vilmar Costa, president of AQK, spoke to the community about the 19 endangered species occurring in the Kalunga Territory. Photo: © Quilombo Kalunga Association Collection

Awareness raising is another essential component of the CEPF funded project. Presentations about 19 endangered species found in the region were widely reported in local schools and municipalities. & #8220; Participating students and teachers posted photos and comments on their social networks, which eventually led to large-scale knowledge of the 19 species of Chapada dos Veadeiros & #8221 ;, said Costa. AQK also made presentations during community meetings and distributed calendars and banners describing local biodiversity and how to protect it.

AQK is now working on creating a online platform which will allow each family to update their own information.

The project was also reported locally by the The Brazilian Report and Eyeing The Ruralists. Recently, the portal G1 Nature has published a series of articles and videos about the Kalunga community.

Read the original text of this article, which is available in English at site CEPF.

About Quilombo Kalunga Association and CEPF Cerrado

The Quilombo Kalunga Association is a non-profit, non-profit civil organization founded in October 1999. It is formed by the Kalunga Associations of Cavalcante, Monte Alegre, Teresina and Engenho II, as well as Epotecampo. She represents the largest quilombo territory in Brazil, with 262 thousand hectares of land. The Association promotes the defense of interest of all communities formed by residents of the Kalunga Historical and Cultural Heritage Site (SHPCK), scattered between the municipalities of Cavalcante, Monte Alegre de Goiás and Teresina de Goiás, and represent them in all instances. legal and administrative

The project “Use of Geoprocessing in the Management of the Kalunga Historical and Cultural Heritage Site - SHPCK”, fostered by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF, from the acronym in English to Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fundand with support from Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB)The project aims to know in depth the reality of Kalunga communities, use geoprocessing technology to map the territory in detail, promote SHPCK occupation in a more sustainable way and make Kalunga internationally recognized as advocates of biodiversity conservation. .


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

Approved in Goiás the first internal regulation of a quilombo in Brazil

Quilombo Kalunga Association Initiative to Model Other Quilombola Communities

by Quilombo Kalunga Association

THE Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK) completed in May the elaboration of the bylaws, a pioneer project at the national level. O rules of procedure for the environmental and territorial management of the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage (SHPCK), for the recognition of Kalunga ancestry and ancestry, and for the exploitation of tourism in the territory. SHPCK is considered the largest quilombo territory in Brazil, with 261,999.69 hectares, and is located in the Chapada dos Veadeiros region, in Goiás.

Vilmar de Souza Costa opens the Assembly of Representatives of the Kalunga Communities to draw up the Rules of Procedure of the Quilombo Kalunga Association. Photo: Maria Lúcia Godinho / AQK Collection.

From March 18 to May 12, 14 assemblies were held, involving all 39 Kalunga communities and attended by over 1,000 people. In these meetings were discussed the most important points that, according to those present, should be contained in the bylaws, were voted by them and approved the contents. In these assemblies the creation of a AQK Representative Council, a collegiate made up of three representatives from each local community, who became part of the board of the Quilombo Kalunga Association.

From May 23rd to 26th, the Assembly of Representatives elected at the community meetings was held at the Kalunga Cavalcante Association. These were moments of intense debate of each article and paragraph, and finally approved.

According Vilmar Souza Costa, president of the Quilombo Kalunga Association, the bylaws are of essential importance to regulate the relations existing within the territory, always respecting the customs, knowledge and traditions of the Kalunga people. “The creation of our regiment is yet another demonstration of the Kalunga people's ability to organize, defend and manage their territory. We collectively and participatively build our own standards, which will be followed by all our people, ”says Costa.

Maria Aparecida Mato, Executive Director of CONAQ - National Coordination of Quilombola Rural Black Communities in Brazil - participated in one of the 14 assemblies and praised the importance of the norms and culture of a quilombola people being put on paper as a written and concrete proof of all that is established. “This is the first quilombo in Brazil to create an internal regiment.. It is an example and a model that will be followed by several other quilombola communities in Brazil, ”he reveals.

Geoprocessing and preservation in assemblies

Another theme of the assemblies was the project “Use of Geoprocessing in the Management of the Historical and Cultural Heritage Site Kalunga & #8211; SHPCK ”, fostered by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF, from the acronym in English to Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) and with support from Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB)The project aims to know in depth the reality of Kalunga communities, use geoprocessing technology to map the territory in detail, promote SHPCK occupation in a more sustainable way and make Kalunga internationally recognized as advocates of biodiversity conservation. .

Representing CEPF / IEB, Michael Jackson speaks on the importance of organizing the Kalunga people to carry out environmental and territorial management. Photo: Maria Lúcia Godinho / AQK Collection.

Since January the survey has been carried out and the socioeconomic register SHPCK residents, with the goal of participation of all 1,500 quilombola families. After the survey, the field surveys will be associated with the cartographic base and the thematic mapping performed through geoprocessing and remote sensing. There will also be a cadastral survey of mining activities, illegal logging and predatory fishing, and tourist attractions.

The assemblies also focused on the mobilization of quilombola families on the importance of biodiversity conservation all over the territory. For this, they were made 4,000 calendars, which were delivered to Kalunga houses, as well as people and strategic locations in the municipalities of Alto Paraíso, Cavalcante, Campos Belos, Monte Alegre de Goiás and Teresina de Goiás. Banners were also made, set in all municipal, state and private schools. in the five municipalities.

According to the previous survey made by the Association, there are 19 locally threatened species found in the region. Conservation target species were prioritized according to the degree of threat criterion, focused on species facing extremely high risk of extinction in nature, requiring urgent conservation actions.

About Quilombo Kalunga Association

The Quilombo Kalunga Association is a non-profit, non-profit civil organization founded in October 1999. It is formed by the Kalunga Associations of Cavalcante, Monte Alegre, Teresina and Engenho II, as well as Epotecampo. She represents the largest quilombo territory in Brazil, with 262 thousand hectares of land. The Association promotes the defense of interest of all communities formed by residents of the Kalunga Historical and Cultural Heritage Site (SHPCK), scattered between the municipalities of Cavalcante, Monte Alegre de Goiás and Teresina de Goiás, and represent them in all instances. legal and administrative

More information:

Phone: (62) 3494-1062

Email: aqkalunga@gmail.com

Facebook gives Aqk.


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Project Team & #8220; Avoiding the Merganser Extinction & #8221; records species in the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park, Goiás

by Gislaine Disconzi, Instituto Amada Terra

Rio Preto, Goiás. Photo: IAT Collection

The project Avoiding the Merganser Extinction in the Veadeiros Corridor & #8211; High Landing & #8211; Kalunga, which is performed by Amada Terra Institute, and has the support of Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF, Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fundand Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB), made a field expedition this April in the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park, Goiás, where he spotted EIGHT INDIVIDUALS of the species (Mergos octosetaceus).

The project has carried out a series of river embarkations, seeking to improve information on the presence of Merganser in the region. The species is considered one of the most threatened Americas and was declared the Ambassador of Brazilian Continental Waters. On April 2 and 3, a team of five people, three canoeing professionals, the project's technical field coordinator and the public use coordinator of the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park, traveled approximately 40 km from the Rio Preto looking for individuals of the species. This is the first of several actions to be undertaken within a protection strategy within the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park, located in the state of Goiás.

Team on expedition to Rio Preto. Photo: IAT Collection

Team on the field: Wellinton from France Lima; Carlos Alexandre Xavier; Guilherme Predebon (Embedded Field Consultant); Fernando H. Previdente (Field Coordinator) and André Ribeiro (PNCV Public Use Coordinator).

See more news about the expedition at site ICMBio in the Planet connection and in social networks!

Watch the video which records the presence of the Brazilian Merganser during the team's expedition to Rio Preto!


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Avoiding the Merganser Extinction in Chapada dos Veadeiros, Goiás, Brazil

The project “Avoiding the extinction of the Brazilian Merganser in the Veadeiros-Pouso Alto-Kalunga corridor” Its activities started in January 2018, in the city of Alto Paraíso de Goiás, located in the Chapada dos Veadeiros region. The project aims to carry out monitoring and research activities of the Merganser, public awareness actions and training on the current conservation status of the species. The project lasts for two years and is funded by the & #8220; Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund ”- (CEPF)with the support of International Institute of Education of Brazil (IIEB). The project is executed by Amada Land Institute of Social Inclusion (IAT)Its basic team is composed by the General Coordinator: Gislaine Disconzi, Field Coordinator: Fernando Previdente, Educommunication Coordinator: Maria Beatriz Maury and Financial Coordinator: Paulo Henrique Golçalves.

Why take care of the Merganser?

With a small population and living in a restricted environment, the Merganser is a rare bird that is critically endangered. Its occurrence is currently only in Brazil. It has already disappeared in the states of Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Paraná and Santa Catarina and also in Argentina and Paraguay. Its presence indicates a good state of conservation of the environment, being a species restricted to environments of rapids, waterfalls and backwaters of clean and crystalline waters.

Some results of the project and its partnerships

Brazilian Merganser Launched as Brazil's Water Ambassador

On March 20th of this year, in the World Water Forum, in Brasilia, the Merganser received from the Ministry of the Environment the title of Ambassador of Brazilian Waters.

AMADA TERRA INSTITUTE TEAM WAS AT THE 8TH WORLD WATER FORUM: Gislaine Disconzi, Project Coordinator, Maria Beatriz Maury, Educommunication Coordinator, along with Ricardo Soavinsky, ICMBIO President, Rita Surrage de Medeiros, Pato Mergulhão PAN Coordinator CEMAVE, Prof. Sávio Bruno Freire, from UFF, Luís Fábio da Silveira, from USP, Paulo Zuquim Antas, from Funatura, Reinaldo Lourival, Nature and International Culture, Fabiane Sebaio, from Cervivo and Sônia Rigueira from Instituto Terra Brasilis. Celebrating the well deserved choice of the Brazilian Merganser for the title of Brazilian Water Ambassador. Photo: © IAT

Sighting of individuals on field expeditions

Since the beginning of the project, trainings, river embarkations and expeditions of reconnaissance of areas of the species registration have been carried out, aiming to locate individuals for future marking, ringing and placement of radios and GPS. In two of these expeditions, a couple and an individual have already been sighted. In Chapada dos Veadeiros, it is estimated that there are about 50 to 60 individuals, which makes these sightings a spectacular result, in a short period of time.

Individual located on the project expedition Avoiding the extinction of the Merganser in Chapada dos Veadeiros. Photo: © IAT

Chapada Television Show

In June, TV Record aired a documentary series about Chapada dos Veadeiros, dedicating an episode to the Merganser. To this end, he accompanied the Project team on one of their expeditions. This is a very positive result, which helps in the conservation of the species.

Record Series

https://noticias.r7.com/jornal-da-record/videos/pesquisadores-tentam-preservar-especies-da-chapada-dos-veadeiros-07062018

To know more

Project Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/pato.mergulhao.7

Project Photos

https://www.facebook.com/pato.mergulhao.7/photos?lst=100002529835047%3A100026683758830%3A1530830913&source_ref=pb_friends_tl

 

* Text provided by Maria Beatriz Maury, Coordinator of Educommunication, Instituto Amada Terra