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Brazilian conservationist honored as & #8216; Hero of the Cerrado & #8211; Biodiversity Hotspot & #8217; by the Partnership Fund for Critical Ecosystems

Damião M. Santos is being recognized for his achievements in the protection of species and ecosystems in the Cerrado

by Julie Shaw, via Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund

 

In the week we celebrate the World Environment Day (05/06), the Partnership Fund for Critical Ecosystems (Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) of hot spot biodiversity expert announces that Damião M. Santos and nine other conservationists from around the world have been named & #8220; Heroes of the Hotspots& #8220; for its efforts to protect places considered for their high biodiversity in the world. The honorees were chosen from among hundreds of civil society organizations that received donations from CEPF in the 10 priority hotspots global biodiversity where the fund currently operates and the announcement was made on the International Biodiversity Day, celebrated on May 22nd.

CEPF is recognizing these heroes as part of its 20th anniversary celebrations. The fund trains non-governmental organizations, indigenous groups, universities and private companies to protect priority hotspots of biodiversity & #8211; the most diverse land regions in the world, but threatened & #8211; and help communities to prosper. O CEPF it does this through subsidies and technical support for conservation, organizational strengthening and sustainable development.

Damião (right) and colleagues studying the implementation of tourist activities on the Paranã River. Photo: © Quilombo Kalunga Association / AQK Collection

The Heroes of Hotspots and the non-governmental organizations for which they work are making extraordinary contributions to conservation. They are examples of dedicated and dynamic people who work to ensure that intact ecosystems can continue to support flora and fauna and provide clean air, fresh water, healthy soils, sustainable livelihoods, resistance to climate change and more.

Damião Santos is a member of the community quilombola Kalunga, which is considered the largest in Brazil and is located in the northwest of the state of Goiás in the municipalities of Cavalcante, Monte Alegre and Teresina de Goiás, part of hot spot of Cerrado biodiversity. He is helping to lead conservation efforts in the community. He headed the forest fire fighting brigade from 2013 to 2018, and was treasurer of the Kalunga Association of Guides from 2011 to 2014.

Under his guidance as president of the Kalunga Engenho II Communication Association from 2015 to 2017, ecotourism efforts have taken major steps, including the construction of trails and bathrooms for tourists, gastronomy courses for restaurant employees, training for guides and expansion of the center assistance to tourists.

& #8220; Damião Santos combines strength, determination, devotion and kindness. He is actively involved in his community and fully committed to biodiversity conservation & #8221; said Peggy Poncelet, CEPF grants director for the biodiversity hotspot in the Cerrado.

Damião was actively involved in the project financed by CEPF, which used georeferencing and socioeconomic surveys to map the Kalunga territory. Collecting information was an arduous process in which Mr. Santos and other team members traveled long distances to visit families scattered throughout the region. The data proved to be highly valuable for the Kalunga people, as well as for local and federal public entities.

& #8220; The Heroes of Hotspots represent the conservationists tenacious and committed people who are acting every day to guarantee the future of priority hotspots biodiversity and the people who depend on these vital ecosystems & #8221 ;, said CEPF Executive Director Olivier Langrand. & #8220; They face a multitude of challenges & #8211; long hours, tiring travel, difficult working conditions, political obstacles and even threats to their lives & #8211; in search of a healthy and sustainable world & #8221 ;.

& #8220; Mr Santos is a determined advocate of his community and the ecosystems on which they depend & #8221; said Langrand. & #8220; Their actions and leadership are helping to ensure a healthy future for the Kalunga community and its nature & #8221 ;.

read more on Damião M. Santos and the others Heroes of Hotspots.

CEPF is a joint initiative of Agence Française de Développement, Conservation International, the European Union, the Global Environment Facility, the Government of Japan and the World Bank.

Since 2001, CEPF has catalyzed biodiversity conservation, led locally through US$ 250 million in donations to more than 2,400 organizations in 98 developing and transition countries. The results include more than 15 million hectares of protected areas established, at least 890 species globally threatened supported and over 3,500 communities benefited. Learn more at www.cepf.net, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

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Contacts:

Michael Becker, leader of CEPF's regional implementation team at the Cerrado biodiversity hotspot, michael.becker@iieb.org.br

Julie Shaw, CEPF's communications director, jshaw@cepf.net


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

CEPF global partners are making a difference

See the seven highlights of the CEPF 2019 Impact Report

by Julie Shaw via Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund

 

Seychelles blue pigeon (Alectroenas pulcherrimus). © O. Langrand

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) has already financed projects carried out by more than 2,400 beneficiaries in 98 countries and territories in 24 of the priority hotspots & #8211; places with high biological diversity and extremely threatened & #8211; of biodiversity in the world. This represents a major conservation effort. But what are the results?

The CEPF Impact Report helps tell the story of what our partners have achieved so far. By analyzing data from CEPF's first grants until the end of fiscal year 2019 (June 30, 2019), CEPF uses 16 indicators to monitor its conservation progress. The report is organized into the four categories, or & #8220; pillars & #8221 ;, of CEPF's work: biodiversity, civil society, human well-being and training conditions. The publication also shares some of the most recent and interesting stories from our beneficiaries around the world, who on a day-to-day basis are implementing conservation strategies, helping communities and governments and building their own expertise to support biodiversity and provide leadership.

Despite the countless challenges that these institutions face, we are proud to say that they are making a big difference. Here are just a few of those highlights:

1. Direct support for 882 globally threatened species

Habitat protection, species monitoring, patrolling, removal of invasive species & #8211; these are just some of the ways in which CEPF beneficiaries are acting directly to protect globally threatened species.

An example of the impact of species is the work of institutions in Wallacea hot spot on Sangihe Island and Yayasan IDEP Selaras Alam and partners on Talaud Island for the conservation of red-blue lory (Eos history), that is threat of extinction. The bird's bright colors make it a target for human trafficking. wild animals. Beneficiaries made the local community aware of the value of the species and its habitat, worked with local authorities to monitor trade and stop hunting, and promoted environmentally sound agricultural practices. The result: improved management of 2,157 hectares of protected forest in Sangihe and 6,720 hectares of agricultural buffer zone for a protected area in Talaud.

See pages 28-31 for more information on species support.

2. Helping to gain formal protection for 15.1 million hectares of biodiversized ecosystems

CEPF monitors the hectares of ecosystems for which beneficiaries have helped to obtain formal legal protections.

Fiscal year 2019 was an important year on that front, with some notable achievements. They include:

  • Creation of Intag Toisán Municipal Conservation and Sustainable Use Area, in the municipality of Cotacachi, northwest of Ecuador. Grantee Fundación Prodeci a Favor de los Derechos Ciudadanos involved local communities and social and governmental entities in the establishment of a protected area of 108,959 hectares, rich in endemic species, rivers, river basins and forests and which has been under threat of agricultural expansion, exploitation illegal logging and large-scale mining.
  • Protection for Ulcinj Salina, an important place in Montenegro for migratory birds. The Bird Research and Protection Center (CZIP) has been working for over 15 years & #8211; with CEPF support from 2013 to 2017 & #8211; to obtain protection for the unique ecosystem formed by artificial salt pans. And in June 2019, the local parliament voted to declare the site a national protected area.

See pages 13-18 for more on concession efforts to create protected areas.

3. 75 organizations in Indonesia strengthened through a single grant

One of CEPF's objectives is to strengthen civil society organizations who work with conservation in priority hotspots of biodiversity in the world. Through its monitoring program, CEPF tracks the progress of each beneficiary organization in key elements of strong organizations at the beginning and end of the CEPF grant. Of the 368 organizations that completed their reporting cycles, 248 reported an increase in organizational capacity (67%).

An impressive example occurred at the Wallacea Biodiversity Hotspot, where beneficiary Yayasan Penabulu was tasked with helping to build the knowledge and skills of emerging organizations through training. The efforts were successful, with data showing that 75 CEPF partners and others were strengthened through the project.

Read more on pages 32-36.

4. Through gender mainstreaming projects, more than 230 Brazilian women join forces

Cerrado National Meeting of Women

CEPF monitors the number of beneficiaries who report having a better understanding and commitment to gender issues during their projects with CEPF. At the hot spot Biodiversity Cerrado, institutions like ActionAid and Ecology and Action (ECOA) have been working to address gender issues in the region, organizing women's groups associations, cooperatives and networks. In the last year, they orchestrated three meetings at hot spot to discuss environmental conservation, climate change, gender and more. These meetings brought together more than 230 women and resulted in the elaboration of two national documents: the letter from the first meeting of women from the Cerrado and the manifestation of resistance from women in the Cerrado. Cerrado and Pantanal. Learn more about this project! 

You can read more about this project and CEPF's follow-up on gender efforts on pages 36-40.

5. About 1,300 projects promoted nature-based solutions to climate change

Projects that promote nature-based solutions to combat climate change are monitored through CEPF's monitoring program and, by the end of fiscal year 2019, 1,295 projects have been identified as belonging to this category, including efforts related toclimate change, climate mitigation, ecosystem resilience, reforestation and much more.

A forest restoration project in Mauritius illustrates the impact that such projects can have. The nation has one of the most endangered island floras in the world, with 89% of its endemic plant species considered to be at risk of extinction. Much of Mauritius' fauna has also disappeared along with its forests. Since 2006, CEPF has been working in the Ebony Forest Reserve to address threats to fauna and flora, including invasive exotic plants, habitat fragmentation, loss of genetic diversity among native species, the effects of climate change and the community's lack of awareness about the importance of protecting ecosystems. In response, Ebony Forest has carried out intensive habitat restoration, and has partnered with the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation to reintroduce indigenous birds. They have maintained 16 hectares of forest and planted 22,982 native plants with the help of children from local schools and corporations.

Read more about its activities and about CEPF monitoring related to climate change on pages 52-55.

6. 36 companies have adopted practices favorable to biodiversity

CEPF tracks the number of companies that adopt friendly practices in relation to biodiversity through projects that received our support. Although CEPF only started collecting this data in 2017, the effort has shown promising results, including:

  • Five companies collaborate with the CEPF partner, the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Zoology, in the promotion and sale of agricultural products & #8220; protected area protectors & #8221; at three locations in Yunnan province and on the island of Hainan in China.
  • Shiwi, a private social enterprise, works with the Peruvian Society of Environmental Law to support a network of private protected areas, through a successful marketing strategy for honey and brown sugar produced by the network.

Read more on pages 63-65.

7. CEPF partners contributed to seven of the 20 Biodiversity Goals of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity and 10 of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals

The Impact Report presents a data table that shows how CEPF fellows have contributed to these global goals, which includes figures such as:

  • 61 projects totaling US$ 6.3 million in donations for proposals focused on reducing the trafficking of wild animals, contributing to Goal 15 of Sustainable Development: Life on Earth.
  • More than 60 coastal protected areas have benefited from increased protection and management, contributing to Sustainable Development Goal 14: Life Under Water.
  • 31 active sustainable financing mechanisms for conservation that have been supported by CEPF, contributing to the Aichi Biodiversity Goal 20 in the mobilization of financial resources.

See the tables on pages 66-71.

There is much more good news in the progress report made so far by beneficiaries of the Fund. Check it out and see why we look forward to continuing to work together for biodiversity!

CEPF reports (impact and annual) are available English version only and can be accessed at the link.

 

Read the original version of the article, which is available in English at site of the Partnership Fund for Critical Ecosystems.

Find the English version here!


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

The unknown Cerrado and its colossal biological relevance

Paepalanthus, a species of flora typical of the Cerrado fields. Photo: Aryanne Amaral / IEB Collection

 

by Michael Becker for publication via Mongabay Brazil

 

The fires that devastated the Amazon last year they put Brazil in the headlines around the world, and with good reason. The iconic rainforest stores millions of tons of carbon dioxide - burning it means a less stable climate across the Earth. But the fires also devastated, to the same extent, another biome in South America, but news coverage of this catastrophe was sparse.

In the center of Brazil (with small portions in Bolivia and Paraguay) are 200 million hectares of the most biodiverse tropical savanna on the planet, with 5% of the world's species: the Cerrado, a region that, like the Amazon, also holds an amount of carbon fundamental to the climatic balance of the planet.

The lack of knowledge about its importance may be due to what is not visible in its landscape: about 70% of the biomass of the Cerrado it is underground, and that means that the carbon reservoirs that it houses in the soil contribute immensely to determine the concentration of CO² in the atmosphere. As they go through a long dry season each year, the Cerrado trees have adapted, growing downward, instead of upward, in search of water.

Because of this, most Brazilians consider the Cerrado to be an “ugly forest” - the trees in the biome are not tall, as in the imposing Amazon.

Today is the International Biodiversity Day, and it is essential to consider the contribution of this biome: rivers and rains within the Cerrado are connected to almost all of Brazil - bringing water to agriculture, hydroelectric power generation and human consumption.

In addition to the 12,070 species of plants and 1,050 species of vertebrate animals, approximately 46 million people currently live on the natural resources from the region: indigenous peoples, traditional communities, family farmers, urban populations, as well as important sectors, such as agribusiness and mining. The Brazilian Cerrado currently concentrates a large part of the production of agricultural commodities of world importance.

The second largest underground water reservoir in the world - the Guarani Aquifer - as well as the largest flooded plain on the planet - the Pantanal - are made up of the Cerrado springs; and its ecosystem is seriously threatened if we continue with the alarming deforestation promoted by large-scale agriculture, which until today has already eliminated 50% of the biome. That's before the fires that swept across much of the region in 2019.

Research shows that deforestation in the Cerrado is 2.5 times higher than in the Amazon, and even so, it does not generate as much social commotion. In regions like MATOPIBA, an acronym related to the expanding agricultural frontier in the states of Maranhão, Tocantins, Piauí and Bahia, the scenario is quite serious - by 2010, 60% of the original cover had been converted into pastures and monocultures, and much of what remains has already suffered some type of anthropic intervention.

The celebration of International Biodiversity Day should remind us that we share our existence with several other beings; as maned wolf, the giant anteater and fruits like the pequi, coquinho-sour and baru, in the case of the Cerrado. One way to interpret biodiversity is to consider that it reflects the interaction of all the elements that make life possible as we know it. So, we need to be responsible for our direct influence on the maintenance of biodiversity, its use and consequences on human, animal and plant life; in any biome or ecosystem.

Covid-19 is the most recent example of human interference in natural processes and their consequences. THE Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) recently released a communication reinforcing the need to reconcile the return to economic activity with the protection of ecosystems and maintenance of biodiversity. If the destruction continues, there will be a significant increase in the likelihood of new pandemics.

There are 1.7 million viruses yet to be identified. Keeping the forests upright prevents us from coming into contact with sources of new diseases. The lesson that the pandemic leaves us is to recognize the vital need to ensure sustainable development in order to maintain our conserved ecosystems if we want to continue to exist. This situation makes us look once again at the unknown Cerrado, which more than ever, if highlighted and protected, will contribute with essential elements, such as water and natural resources, to overcome this and any other future crisis.

At the moment, initiatives such as those being carried out by the Partnership Fund for Critical Ecosystems and at International Institute of Education of Brazil are helping to find the path to this new model towards the sustainable development. The fund has 52 partner institutions, united in the conservation of Cerrado biodiversity and the services it provides to Brazilians. The actions involve 6,335 people and protect 11,533,753 hectares of the biome. In addition to contributing to the processing of 108,125.76 kg of raw material extracted from the Cerrado, which promotes an increase in income for the communities of R$ 119,264.00 in the sale of native seeds and R$ 245,443.78 in Cerrado fruits.

The great results we have achieved so far, certainly bring us a reason for celebration in this International Biodiversity Daybecause it demonstrates that it is possible to reap many fruits of this reconciliation of the use of biodiversity with its protection, which bring direct benefits to the populations that share the Cerrado.

Read the article in full on the Mongabay Brazil!

Find the English version here!

 

Michael Becker is the leader of the CEPF regional implementation team (Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund, or Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) and has been working since 2000 to ensure civil society's contribution to the conservation of rich and highly threatened ecosystems. In Brazil since 2016, CEPF works with the support of the International Education Institute of Brazil (IEB), a Brazilian third sector institution dedicated to training and qualifying people. This is the list of organizations that are part of the network: http://cepfcerrado.iieb.org.br/lista-projetos/

We thank and congratulate each of our partners for their tireless effort to fight the conservation of the Cerrado and its peoples!


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

The 1st Partners Meeting and CEPF Cerrado Expert Meeting took place in Brasilia

From April 8 to 10 (2019), the CEPF Cerrado Regional Implementation Team promoted in Brasilia the 1st CEPF Partner Meeting and Expert Meeting Cerrado. The guests were attended by 56 representatives of organizations that conduct projects under CEPF Cerrado, experts, advisory board members and CEPF grant director Peggy Poncelet.

In the first two days the meeting had the goal present results achieved with the Fund to date, strategies for conservation of the Cerrado, celebrate results, point out ways for a possible next phase of CEPF in the Cerrado, promote integration among participants and strengthen the connection between projects. To this end, the entire CEPF team and its partners were immersed in sharing experiences, socializing themes such as restoration, research, territorial management, conservation, strengthening civil society, etc., in dialogue and recognition of the different territories that O CEPF encompasses and reflects the structure and operation of the Fund in the Cerrado. In the end, participants had the opportunity to evaluate CEPF and build a joint proposal of what could be the second phase of the fund in the Cerrado, should it occur. For Vilmar Costa, president of the Quilombo Kalunga Association, & #8220; this meeting was an opportunity to bring awareness to the Kalunga people, to commit to increasingly defend the Cerrado with partners and strengthen this network & #8221;

On the last day the meeting of experts, attended by part of the team of the International Institute of Education of Brazil (IEB), researchers Mercedes Bustamente and Mônica Nogueira, both from the University of Brasilia and members of third sector organizations working in the biome, such as Isabel Figueiredo ( ISPN), Mario Barroso (TNC) and Marcos Tito (IUCN). On this day, CEPF Cerrado implementation strategy coordinator Michael Becker gave a presentation on CEPF Cerrado and the results of the partner meeting, and the group was invited to reflect on the present state and project a vision of the future for the Cerrado on topics such as global conservation priorities and best practices, actions by civil society organizations, global conservation priorities, public policies, and threats to conservation. Peggy Poncelet, CEPF's grant director, said she was delighted to have the opportunity to see so many people present and to monitor the engagement and contributions that each has brought to the discussions these days, and hopes that This meeting between people and institutions will be the opportunity for projects to interact in order to seek new partners and ideas, which will help in the implementation of these projects & #8221 ;.

 

First CEPF Cerrado partner meeting and expert meeting. Photo: IEB Collection
Photo: Aryanne Amaral / IEB Collection
Photo: Aryanne Amaral / IEB Collection
Photo: Aryanne Amaral / IEB Collection

 


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

CEPF Cerrado will host partner meeting and expert meeting to discuss Fund and Cerrado

The CEPF Cerrado Regional Implementation Team (acronym for Crytical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) will promote the partner meeting and expert meeting to discuss the biome as well as the actions and impacts of the Fund in the Cerrado. The event will happen between the days April 08-10, from 09h to 18h, at the Support Foundation for Research, Teaching, Extension and Institutional Development (FINATEC), in Brasília (DF).

This meeting has the goal present results achieved with CEPF to date, strategies for conservation of the Cerrado, celebrate results, promote integration among participants and strengthen the connection between projects. Invited will include representatives of CEPF project organizations, experts from various fields, advisory board members and CEPF grant director Peggy Poncelet. It is estimated that approximately 70 people will participate over these 3 days.

For Michael Becker, coordinator of the CEPF Cerrado implementation strategy, this will be the opportunity to think about the future vision of the CEPF in the Cerrado, and at the same time, a great opportunity for interaction between beneficiaries of ongoing projects & #8221 ;.

CEPF Partners Cerrado in the training offered in Brasilia in November (2018). Photo Aryanne Amaral / IEB Collection
Teams from IEB, CEPF, CI, ECOA, Neotropic Foundation of Brazil and WWF-Brazil.
Meeting with project partners operating in the northeastern portion of the Cerrado. Photo: IEB Collection

 


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

CEPF Cerrado and IEB Select 5 Small Support Projects in 3rd Call for Letters of Intent 2018

The Regional Implementation Team (RIT) of the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF Cerrado) makes the outcome of the proposal selection process official. Small Grants / Small Grants gives Tthird ChamLetter of Intent (CDI) 2018.

In response to the announcement, we received all 76 projectsamong Small and Big Supports. The proposals were initially screened where the eligibility criteria set out in the notice were reviewed. Then, each project was evaluated by two external experts who scored the proposals according to the criteria defined by CEPF in conjunction with the IEB. The best technically evaluated projects were submitted for review and final decision by a selection committee.

The projects were evaluated considering the specific outline of this second notice that sought to support actions focused on the following Investment Priorities: 2.1 - Support studies and analyzes needed to justify the creation and expansion of public protected areas, promoting the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity and the enhancement of local and traditional culture.2.2 - Promote the inclusion of existing indigenous peoples, quilombolas and traditional populations, respecting and integrating their traditional knowledge, for conservation / restoration planning by government and civil society; and 6.2 - Develop and strengthen technical and management capacities. from civil society organizations on environment, conservation strategy and planning, policy dialogue, resource mobilization, in accordance with regulations and other topics relevant to investment priorities.

In the end, were approved Five Proposals for Small Support that best responded to the specific clipping of this notice. Below we provide, in alphabetical order by the name of the organization, the list of the 05 (five) small projects selected in this Third Call 2018:

No. Investment Priority Project name Organization INITIALS
1 2.1

Proposal of creation of conservation units in the city of Uberaba (MG) Association for the Environmental Management of the Triangulo Mineiro ANGÁ
2 6.2 Cerrado Island in Central Brazil: Xavante Governance for Conservation Xavante Association of Etenhiritipá AXE
3 2.2 Poke & #8217; exhaust uti: managing and protecting our territory for the autonomy of the Terena people Indian Work Center CTI
4 2.2 Integrating the traditional Cajueiro community in the conservation of protected areas in Januária, MG Institute for Social and Ecological Development IDESE
5 6.2 Caring for the Cerrado and promoting life Riacho dos Machados Rural Workers Union STR

The Small Projects who have been selected will receive individual announcements about the next steps. Proposals that have not been selected have already received individual announcements about the outcome of the selection process.

We inform interested parties that Big ones Projects They also went through these evaluation stages in Brazil and were referred to the CEPF team in Washington, which consists of the final stage of the selection process and final decision. Shortly, applicants submitting their projects in this category will receive an individual statement from the Washington (USA) team.

We welcome the small projects selected and wish everyone that this partnership that is just beginning is a great growth for all of us!

We thank all the organizations that submitted their projects in this Third Call, congratulating them for their invaluable work in the conservation of our dear Cerrado biome!

 

Brasilia, March 14, 2019

 

Regards,

CEPF Cerrado Regional Implementation Team (RIT)

International Institute of Education of Brazil

SCLN 211 Block B Rooms 101 and 102, Asa Norte, Brasília-DF

Tel. 55 (61) 3248-7449 Zip code. 70863-532

www.cepfcerrado.iieb.org.br


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

CEPF and IEB launch new call for projects in Cerrado

 

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) for the Cerrado hotspot and the Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB) launch the Third Call for Letters of Intent (CDI) targeted at innovative and relevant conservation projects. Interested parties can apply until December 12, 2018.

This call is open to community groups and associations, non-governmental organizations, private companies, universities (foundations), research institutes and other civil society organizations.

Letters of intent must be formulated for Small Projects (up to US$ 50,000) and Large Projects (above US$ 50,000 and maximum US$ 200,000).

Proposals for the invitation to bid must address only the following Investment Priorities:

● Investment Priority 2.1 - Support studies and analyzes needed to justify the creation and expansion of public protected areas, promoting the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity and the enhancement of local and traditional culture.

● Investment Priority 2.2 - Promote the inclusion of indigenous peoples, quilombolas and existing traditional populations, while respecting and integrating their traditional knowledge, for conservation / restoration planning by government and civil society.

● Investment Priority 6.2 - Develop and strengthen the technical and management capacities of civil society organizations in environmental matters, conservation strategy and planning, policy dialogue, resource mobilization, in accordance with regulations and other topics relevant to investment priorities.

Access the full notice of Third Call on the CEPF Cerrado website. Specific questions can be taken by email (cepfcerrado@iieb.org.br) or go to the FAQs.

Sign up to receive the electronic bulletin from CEPF Cerrado.


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan, the MacArthur Foundation and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

IEB and CEPF promote in November Third Cerrado Project Call

The International Institute of Education of Brazil (IEB) invites civil society organizations, community groups, businesses and other stakeholders for presentations on the 3rd Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) Notice. Hot spot Thick. In addition to the presentation of the announcement, training will be held, focused on projects already contracted by CEPF.

The presentation of the announcement and the training have already been held in Arinos (MG), Campo Grande (MS) and Campinas (SP). The next performances will take place in the cities of Teresina (PI), Belo Horizonte (MG) and Brasilia (DF):

Teresina: 11/19 from 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm. Location: Pastoral Land Commission & #8211; Rua Desembargador Pires de Castro, 631 & #8211; North center.

Belo Horizonte: 11/23 from 1:30 pm - 5:00 pm. Venue: Auditorium of the Regional Council of Biology (CRBio) & #8211; Av. Amazonas, 298 & #8211; 15th floor.

Brasilia: 11/27 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Location: Assunção Retreat House & #8211; SGAN 611, L2 North, module E, Brasília-DF.  

The main themes in this third announcement will be the management of protected areas, mosaics and biosphere reserves; the involvement of traditional and indigenous populations in territory management and capacity building for civil society organizations.

CEPF wishes to improve the technical and management conditions of civil society organizations in the Cerrado, strengthening them for the proposition, implementation and management of projects focusing on the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in the hotspot. This improvement will take place through training including gender related to the conservation of natural resources.

The Fund seeks to protect the world's most biologically rich and endangered regions known as priority hotspots of biodiversity. A key objective is to ensure civil society engagement in biodiversity conservation. CEPF is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, the Global Environment Fund, the Government of Japan, the John D. Foundation and the World Bank.

Make your registration in site for more information.

News published on site from the International Institute of Education of Brazil.

 

Teresine (PI) & #8211; November 19th
Belo Horizonte (MG) & #8211; November 23
Brasilia (DF) & #8211; November 27th

CEPF Cerrado Selects 5 Small Support Projects in 2nd Call for Letters of Intent 2017

 

The Regional Implementation Team (RIT) of the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF Cerrado) makes the outcome of the proposal selection process official. Small Supports gives Second Call for Letters of Intent (CDI) 2017.

In response to the announcement, we received all 68 projects, being 23 Small Support projects. The proposals were initially screened where the eligibility criteria set out in the notice were reviewed. Then, each project was evaluated by two external experts who scored the proposals according to the criteria defined by CEPF in conjunction with the IEB. The best technically evaluated projects were submitted for analysis and final decision by CEPF Cerrado and IEB staff.

The projects were evaluated considering the specific outline of this second notice that sought to support actions aimed at the following strategic directions: 3) Restoration: propose solutions to monitor restoration efforts, increase private investment in restoration in the Cerrado and scale restoration efforts; 4) Species (Priority 4.1): implement National Action Plans (PANs) for priority species, focusing on habitat management and protection; 5) Monitoring (Priority 5.2): collect and disseminate monitoring data on the quantity and quality of water resources to integrate and share data on major hotspot watersheds; 6) Strengthening civil society (Priority 6.1): strengthen the capacities of civil society organizations to participate in collective bodies and processes related to the management of territories and natural resources.

In the end, were approved Five Proposals for Small Support that best responded to the specific clipping of this notice. Below is, in alphabetical order, the list of the 05 (five) projects selected in this Second call 2017 To receive Small Supports:

No. Strategic direction Project name Organization UF
1 4 (4.1)

 

Ecology and recovery of Uebelmannia buiningui Donald (Cactaceae) Jurumi Institute MG
2 6 (6.1) I FENACO - I Forum of the Midwest Environmentalists INCOME DF, MT, MS, GO
3 5 (5.2) Local water resource management action planning in Biodiversity Corridor Mirador-Mesas (Piauí) Pastoral Land Commission / Aidenvironment PI
4 3 Mapping of isolated trees and the potential of natural regeneration in Cerrado cultivated pastures Arthur Bernardes Foundation (FUNARBE) TO
5 5 (5.2) Chapada dos Guimarães Corridor Water Resources Mapping Pantanal Research Center (CPP) MT

The Small Projects (selected and unselected) received individual announcements about the outcome of the selection process.

Please be advised that Big Projects They also went through these evaluation stages in Brazil and were referred to the CEPF team in Washington for the final stage of the process and final decision.

We welcome the small projects selected and wish everyone that this partnership that is just beginning is a great growth for all of us!

We thank all the organizations that submitted their projects in this Second Call, congratulating them for their invaluable work in the conservation of our dear Cerrado biome!

 

Brasilia, May 2, 2018.

 

Regards,

CEPF Cerrado Regional Implementation Team (RIT)

International Institute of Education of Brazil

SCLN 211 Block B Rooms 101 and 102, Asa Norte, Brasília-DF

Tel. 55 (61) 3248-7449 Zip code. 70863-532

www.cepfcerrado.iieb.org.br

 

How to submit your proposal to CEPF 2nd Call?

The term for sending proposals to CEPF Cerrado Second Call It now closes on November 8th (2017). 

It is call It is open to community groups and associations, non-governmental organizations, private companies, universities, research institutes and other civil society organizations. Letters of intent should be formulated to Small Projects (up to US$ 50,000) and Large Projects (up to US$ 50,000 and maximum US$ 200,000). Proposals will be accepted in the following Strategic Directions and Investment Priorities:

Strategic Direction 3 - Promote and strengthen the productive chains associated with sustainable use of natural resources and ecological restoration in the hostpot (As defined in the edict).

Investment Priority 4.1- Support the implementation of National Action Plans (NAPs) for priority species, focusing on habitat management and protection (Small Projects Only).

Investment Priority 5.2 - Support the collection and dissemination of water resources quantity and quality monitoring data to integrate and share data on the main hotspot watersheds.

Investment Priority 6.1 - Strengthen the capacities of civil society organizations to participate in collective bodies and processes related to the management of territories and natural resources.

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR PROPOSAL?

To submit the projects, the tenderer who will apply for the support of Small Projects must submit your proposal through the platform PROSAS. Proponents who will compete for support from Great Projects must submit their proposals through the platform ConservationGrants

 

Access the full notice of Second call on the CEPF Cerrado website. Specific questions can be taken by email (cepfcerrado@iieb.org.br) or on our website. site.

 

CEPF Cerrado team will announce its 2nd public notice in the states of Tocantins, Mato Grosso and Maranhão

© Michael Becker / IEB

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) It is a joint program of the French Agency for Development, International Conservation, European Union, Global Environment Fund (GEF), Government of Japan, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and World Bank to support the protection and conservation of unique and threatened ecosystems (priority hotspots), like the Cerrado, for example.

This month, CEPF Cerrado is touring some states in Brazil to publicize its second notice to support projects in the hot spot Thick. Presentations have already been held in the cities of Campo Grande (MS), Barreiras (BA) and São Luís (MA). In the coming weeks, visits are planned in the cities of Cuiabá (MT), Palmas (TO), Caxias (MA) and Imperatriz (MA). The presentations will detail how institutions can apply to secure resources for developing Cerrado-focused projects.

It is call It is open to community groups and associations, non-governmental organizations, private companies, universities, research institutes and other civil society organizations. Letters of intent should be formulated to Small Projects (up to US$ 50,000) and Large Projects (up to US$ 50,000 and maximum US$ 200,000). Interested parties can apply until November 08, 2017.

Access the full notice of Second call on the CEPF Cerrado website. Specific questions can be taken by email (cepfcerrado@iieb.org.br) or on our website. site.

Launch events of the second CEPF Cerrado public notice in the states of Mato Grosso, Maranhão and Tocantins:

* Presence must be confirmed by email: cepfcerrado@iieb.org.br

City State Place Date Schedule
Cuiaba / MT INPP Meeting Room 18/10/17 2 pm
Caxias / MA Caxias Higher Studies Center, UEMA, meeting room 17/10/17 4 pm
Empress / MA UFMA, Campus Center, Room 3 19/10/17 9 am
Palms / TO Palmas Human Rights Center Auditorium & #8211; CDH 19/10/17 2 pm

CEPF Cerrado launches new call for projects throughout the hotspot

Mauritania flexuosa Lf & #8211; Buriti

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund & #8211; CEPF launches the Second Call for Letters of Intent (CDI) focused on innovative and relevant conservation projects for the Cerrado Hotspot. Interested parties can apply until November 8, 2017.

This call is open to community groups and associations, non-governmental organizations, private companies, universities, research institutes and other civil society organizations.

Letters of intent must be formulated for Small Projects (up to US$ 50,000) and Large Projects (above US$ 50,000 and maximum US$ 200,000).

Proposals to this notice should include only the following Strategic Directions and Investment Priorities:

Strategic Direction 3 & #8211; Promote and strengthen the productive chains associated with sustainable use of natural resources and ecological restoration in the hostpot (As defined in the notice).

Investment Priority 4.1- Support the implementation of National Action Plans (NAPs) for priority species, focusing on habitat management and protection (Small Projects Only).

Investment Priority 5.2 & #8211; Support the collection and dissemination of water resources quantity and quality monitoring data to integrate and share data on major hotspot watersheds.

Investment Priority 6.1 & #8211; Strengthen the capacities of civil society organizations to participate in collective bodies and processes related to the management of territories and natural resources.

Access the full notice of Second call on the CEPF Cerrado website. Specific questions can be taken by email, cepfcerrado@iieb.org.br .

Sign up to receive the newsletter from CEPF Cerrado.

Global fund to support Cerrado biodiversity conservation initiatives

IEB will be the team responsible for the regional implementation of the project in Cerrado

Parque Nacional da Chapada dos Veadeiros
Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park Region. Photo: Letícia Freire / IEB

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) is a fund to protect the world's most diverse and endangered biodiversity areas, also known as biodiversity hotspots. Conservation International administers the global program on behalf of the fund's partners: the French Development Agency, the World Bank, Conservation International, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the World Environment Fund. Environment (GEF), the Government of Japan and the European Union. A board of high-level representatives from each donor partner manages this fund.

CEPF supports non-governmental organizations, community groups and other civil society partners in implementing strategic conservation projects in biodiversity hotspots. CEPF's focus is to provide opportunities for its beneficiaries to preserve the rich natural resources of hotspots that are vital to people's well-being and the health of the economy in general.

After supporting the Atlantic Forest with investments between 2001 and 2008, the CEPF Donor Council chose the Cerrado in 2013 to receive investments. This decision was followed by the construction of an Ecosystem Profile, through a process of consultations and meetings, which took place between 2014 and 2015, and the selection of the team that will be responsible for the implementation of the initiative in the Cerrado.

Following a selection process, in April 2016, the Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB) was chosen by the CEPF Donor Council to act as Regional Implementation Team (RIT) for the Cerrado Biodiversity Hotspot, beginning this month. July 2016 and expected completion in June 2021.

As CEPF implementation team, IEB will lead the program in the hotspot, converting the investment strategy defined in the Ecosystem Profile into a coherent portfolio of support. IEB was selected as RIT because it demonstrated a strong track record of work experience in Brazil, program management of similar size, scale and complexity to RIT, and experience in direct management of small support programs.

The full Portuguese version of the Cerrado Biodiversity Hotspot Ecosystem Profile can be found on the CEPF website (click here).

A technical summary of this document can be found on the CEPF website (click here).