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Grande Sertão Cooperative publishes reference term to hire specialized technical service

THE Grande Sertão Cooperative has been developing actions around sustainability and agroecology, discussing new concepts, presenting solutions and developing strategies for collaborative action in order to promote the strengthening of agroextractive communities. Among the actions developed there is a continuous process of transferring and building knowledge with training practices in associativism and cooperativism, good production practices and development of food products with fruits of the Cerrado, in addition to seeking to strengthen the management and conservation of rural territories where sustainable agroextractivism.

Thus, productive chains of Cerrado fruits have been organized, built and strengthened, as an example: the buriti (Mauritania flexuosa) that occurs in paths with plenty of water, it has been used in a sustainable way for the production of pulps and oil extraction; The pequi (Caryocar brasiliense) used for the production of flour, pulp and oil; The coquinho-sour (Butia captata) used for the production of frozen pulp, beers and sweets; The baru (Dipteryx alata), which in addition to consumption in natura, is being tested for the production of oils and other potential products, which are under development. The Cooperative continues to seek ways to expand its work to new communities and municipalities in the north of Minas Gerais, with a focus on strengthening local economies and promoting the conservation of ecosystems.

In this sense, the Grande Sertão Cooperative makes public the term of reference for hiring a specialized technical service to support technical assistance, aiming at the standardization and continuous improvement of the nutritional and sanitary quality of the products of the Cerrado that are collected, processed and commercialized by the Cooperative. The objective is to enhance the sustainable use of native Cerrado fruits and strengthen the economies of agroextractive communities, aiming at the best practices of management and conservation of the hot spot Cerrado and the corridor Grande Sertão Veredas-Peruaçu within the project “Grande Sertão - Extraction, Conservation and Income”.

Professionals interested in performing the services presented will have until the day July 27, 2020 at 11:59 pm, to send via e-mail your proposals, together with the requested documentation as described in Reference term.

For more information, contact:

José Fábio Soares

telephone: (38) 3223-2285

email: cooperativagrandesertao@gmail.com

 

Access the Terms of Reference:


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

On Biodiversity Day, women from the Cerrado debate ways of life and resistance in the territories

Transmission is part of the series of lives '' Chats: Knowledge of the peoples of the Cerrado and Biodiversity ''

On May 22, the date that marks International Biodiversity Day, the National Campaign in Defense of the Cerrado starts the series of virtual broadcasts '' Chats: Knowledge of the Cerrado Peoples and Biodiversity '', carried out in partnership with the Observatory of the Ruralists. The debut episode will be broadcast on 4 PM and will present the theme ''The strength of the women of the Cerrado: roots and breakers'', with the participation of representatives of entities and movements that integrate different fronts of the struggle for rights in Cerrado territories.

The first episode of the series will shed light on the ways of life and the forms of resistance of women who break coconut babassu and the roots of the Cerrado. Aparecida Vieira and the quilombola Lucely Morais, masters in Traditional Knowledge from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) and University of Brasília (UnB), respectively, will represent the roots in the dialogue wheel. Both are part of the coordination of Articulação Pacari, a socio-environmental network formed by community organizations that practice traditional medicine through the sustainable use of the Cerrado's biodiversity.

The team of coco-babaçu breakers will have the participation of Socorro Teixeira, from Tocantins, president of Rede Cerrado and part of the Coordination of the Interstate Movement of Coco-babaçu Breakers (MIQCB), and Helena Gomes, from Piauí, vice coordinator of the MIQCB. Maria Emília Pacheco, from FASE and the National Articulation of Agroecology (ANA), will join the chat as a debater along with Valéria Santos, from the Pastoral Land Commission (CPT) and the executive coordination of the National Campaign in Defense of the Cerrado, which will facilitate the dialog wheel.

Guardians and guardians of traditional knowledge

The peoples of the Cerrado are heirs and operationalize ancestral and traditional knowledge that have guided the management of forests and landscapes for many generations, making this rich savannah one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet. “If there is still a Cerrado standing, it is because these peoples have their feet on the ground of the Cerrado. That is why there is no defense of the Cerrado without the defense of the Cerrado territories, where these peoples conserve biodiversity through their ways of life '', says Valéria Santos, executive coordinator of the National Campaign in Defense of the Cerrado.

The widespread use of the coconut babassu palm by the breakers from Maranhão to Mato Grosso (passing through Pará, Piauí, Tocantins and reaching Chiquitania in Bolivia) depends on a set of knowledge passed on among women over many generations. Through these multiple uses, & #8220; mother-palm & #8221 ;, as the breakers say, brings food and sustenance to thousands of families in our Cerrado.

Despite this, breakers often have to fight against large landowners who want to cut down palm trees and prevent them from accessing babassu trees. All of this led them to organize themselves in the MIQCB to achieve & #8220; release the coconut & #8221; and become stronger in production and marketing.

Monkey pepper, Cerrado tree for economic and traditional use. Photo: © Aryanne Amaral / IEB Collection

Another traditional knowledge of the peoples of the Cerrado is the use of medicinal plants that make up the & #8220; Pharmacopoeia Popular do Cerrado & #8221 ;. The roots and roots are recognized in their communities by the practice of different healing trades from the application of varieties of plants, roots, fruits, clays and their preparations. "The criminalization and depreciation of the biocultural importance of these practices led the roots to organize themselves in the Pacari Articulation and to launch the Biocultural Protocol of Raizeiras do Cerrado, seeking to defend their right to practice traditional medicine," says Valéria.

In addition, the lack of recognition of the importance of their practices for the cultural and biological diversity of the Cerrado was not enough, the breakers and the rootstocks have still faced the threat of a new type of theft and encircling: the appropriation by companies of the genetic heritage of which they are guardians .

Programming

The series of chats '' Knowledge of the Peoples of the Cerrado and Biodiversity '' will transmit dialogues focused on the populations that promote the conservation of the Cerrado's biodiversity: indigenous, quilombolas and the traditional peoples and communities of the region. With two episodes scheduled per month, the series will run until August.

In this moment of pandemic due to the coronavirus, Aparecida Vieira highlights the importance of the initiative to make the work of women in rural areas visible in the territories. '' We need to announce that the work of women guardians of traditional knowledge has not been interrupted in this moment in which we live. On the contrary, it is fundamental work for the health of communities '', highlights the root girl.

CEPF Cerrado and the National Campaign in Defense of the Cerrado

The National Campaign in Defense of the Cerrado visits Traditional Communities and Peoples in the Mirador-Tables Corridor, located in the states of Maranhão, Piauí and Tocantins, through the Project ''Network articulation and social participation for the conservation of the Cerrado' ', which is supported by the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) and the International Institute of Education of Brazil (IEB), with the coordination of the ActionAid Brasil. With a focus on enhancing the ways of life of Traditional Peoples and Communities and in strengthening social participation actions and the fight for territorial rights of these groups, the research seeks to subsidize the performance of the Campaign, its member organizations and the populations living in the Cerrado.

 

Service:

Virtual debate '' The strength of the women of the Cerrado: roots and breakers ''

Date / time: May 22, at 4 pm (Brasília time)

Transmission channel: www.facebook.com/campanhacerrado

Realization: National Campaign in Defense of the Cerrado

Partnership: Observatório De Olho nos Ruralistas

 

Press Contact:

Bruno Santiago

comunicacerrado@gmail.com

+55 011 99985 0378


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Family farmers launch virtual store with products from the Cerrado and Caatinga biomes

Central do Cerrado's e-commerce brings together more than 30 associations and cooperatives from different parts of the country

Pequi extraction (Caryocar brasiliense), Community of Pedras, Januária, MG. Photo: Andre Dib

Baru, jatobá, pequi, umbu. Regional ingredients that symbolize the biodiversity found in Brazilian flavors. The Cerrado and Caatinga harvest inspires farmers living in these territories - in the states of Minas Gerais, Federal District, Tocantins, Bahia, Mato Grosso do Sul, Mato Grosso, Maranhão, Pará and Goiás - to benefit food products and produce handicrafts with cultural wealth that guarantees autonomy and income.

Communities of extractive family farmers lead this work, which rarely occupy supermarket shelves. Together they form the Central do Cerrado: a cooperative formed by more than 30 community organizations (between cooperatives and associations) and acts as a bridge between those who produce and those who consume. In times of strengthening the delivery service, the Central opens a new platform where the internet user from anywhere in the country finds more than 200 items and can receive them without leaving home.

“With the situation of COVID19 and social isolation, many of these communities had their production outlets compromised. Sale through the online store is a way to sell products from these communities and guarantee income for agroextractive families. Commercialization helps to keep the Cerrado and Caatinga standing, conserve native biodiversity, encourages staying in the countryside, values local culture and the traditional way of life ”, emphasizes the executive secretary of the Central do Cerrado, Luis Roberto Carrazza.

The agroindustries of the producer communities of the Central do Cerrado operate observing the basic care of social distance, use of masks, extra care for personal hygiene, sterilization of the structures of equipment and supplies: details also observed by the staff of the Central do Cerrado in the preparation and shipping online store orders.

Pequi chestnuts (Cooperuaçu). Photo: Marcus Desimoni / NITRO

Socio-biodiversity products 

Among the purchase options are foods such as special flours with emphasis on the babassu mesocarp (500g, R$ 15) from the Cooperative of Small Agroextractive Producers of Esperantinópolis (Coopaesp) of the traditional community of quebradeiras, in Esperantinópolis, in Maranhão; the buriti flour (1 kg, R$ 50) from the cooperative Grande Sertão de Montes Claros, Northern Minas Gerais - in addition to the non-transgenic corn flake (500g, R$ 7) (raw material for northeastern couscous) from the Agricultural Cooperative Regional Joint of Irecê (Copirecê), of Irecê, in Bahia.

Brazilian chestnuts are also highlighted on the new website, among them the chestnut-of-baru of the Copabase cooperative (300g, R$35), super protein and energetic, one of the great icons of the Cerrado. Little used by chefs, the chestnut-of-pequi (100g, R$15) is also among the oilseeds offered by the Cerrado Central side by side with roasted licuri almonds (100g, R$7), from the Production Cooperative of the Piedmont Region from Diamantina (Coopes), also called coquinho in Bahia and rich in proteins. In the drinks category, the page features the pequi liqueur from the family brand Savana Brasil (700ml, R$70) and the sour coconut fruit beer (600ml, R$ 25) from the Grande Sertão cooperative, in Montes Claros, Minas Gerais.

Baru nut (Copabase). Photo: Raimundo Sampaio / Cajuí Digital Communication Collection

In addition to the products, the Internet user finds information about the social origin of the producing communities and the territorial origin. Among the contents of the platform are recipes, technical sheets and usage tips.

Learn more about Central do Cerrado

The Central do Cerrado is a cooperative formed by several community organizations of family farmers from the Cerrado and Caatinga. Our mission is to maintain the traditional ways of life and conservation of the territories where these peoples live by selling products developed through the sustainable use of native biodiversity.

Service
Launch of the Central do Cerrado virtual store

Day 15/05 (Friday)
Ecosocial Products from the Cerrado and Caatinga

Deliveries all over Brazil
www.centraldocerrado.org.br

 Press contact: cajui@cajuicomunicacaodigital.com.br


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

COPABASE launches series of booklets aimed at family farmers

THE Sustainable Family Farming Cooperative Based on Solidarity Economy & #8211; COPABASE, founded on February 23, 2008, in the city of Arinos / MG is a promoter in the articulation of actions focused on Sustainable Regional Development and that saw in the structuring of interest groups in several agroextractive productive chains, the need for organization and autonomy of the families of family farmers and extractivists in a legal instrument capable of acting not only in the organization of production, but also in guaranteeing the processing and commercialization of the products that emerge, maintaining the principle of sustainability.

Through the support of Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) and Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB), COPABASE has been executing the project Sustainable production practices as promoters of biodiversity conservation in the Urucuiano Sertão, whose objective is to promote the diversification of production agroextractive with sustainable management through the collective structuring of families in the Urucuia River basin region, one of the main tributaries of the São Francisco River. Throughout its activities, the project has already disseminated sustainable technologies and practices for agroextractive production, food security and socioeconomic organization and has developed biodiversity conservation actions in the Cerrado Urucuiano, through the involvement of rural families and a network of partner organizations. One of the products of this dissemination work was the booklets, which deal with themes such as: agroecology, cooperatives, water, pests and diseases, etc. All this material will be distributed to family farmers in the areas where the project operates.

Until then, through technical assistance and visits made by the team, the project collected various data, georeferenced the properties and reached an area of coverage that adds up to 2,500 ha. In December 2019, the communities involved went from 20 to 52, involving extractivist farmers 10 cities around the cooperative.

Access the booklets in full:

 

Are you interested? Meet the COPABASE and its products through the site!

Find out more projects supported by CEPF Cerrado and IEB in our site.


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Cerrado Network: 27 years of articulation of traditional peoples and communities

by Thays Puzzi, Communication Officer of Rede Cerrado

Support from CEPF and DGM / Brazil has managed to multiply strengthening and integrating actions among the 50 member organizations

Established in the 1990s during the ECO-92 by a group of entities that, at that moment, saw in the network articulation a strategy of struggle and resistance, the Cerrado Network, over more than 25 years of history, has become a reference in the social and environmental area and in supporting the construction of public policies aimed at conserving the Cerrado and guaranteeing rights to the peoples and traditional communities that inhabit the Biome. In the last two years (2018-2019), in particular, the Cerrado Network, through the support of Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) It's from DGM / Brazil, has been able to multiply strengthening and integrating actions among the 50 other member organizations.

Opening table of the IX Meeting and Fair of the Cerrado People, held from September 11-14, 2019, Brasilia, DF. Photo: ©Aryanne Amaral/IEB Collection

“Rede Cerrado worked with associated organizations to support, for example, the Federal Public Prosecution Service in building a platform of Traditional Territories, held a series of meetings and seminars on territories with representatives of traditional peoples and communities, held the ninth edition of the Cerrado People's Fair and Meeting and is in the final stages of support in building an application, developed by IPAM, to traditional territory mapping. Many actions were carried out with the support of CEPF and associated entities, ”said Rodrigo Noleto, coordinator of the Amazon Program of the Society, Population and Nature Institute (ISPN). For him, it is important to keep the Cerrado Network alive, because, according to Noleto, it is often the voice of help, support and articulation of traditional peoples and communities. "I hope that the Cerrado Network can be strengthened, and maintain the necessary articulation conditions for this period we live in," he said.

The sentiment is shared by Gerdau Samuel Caetano, from the Center for Alternative Agriculture of Northern Minas Gerais (CAA-NM). For him, the Cerrado Network is a strategic partner for organizations that value the sustainable development and a more harmonious relationship with the environment. “The Cerrado Network has established itself as a political space for these organizations, as it provides the unification of struggles with a more qualified and strategic debate. It's where we, traditional Cerrado peoples and communities, we exchange experiences, think and formulate public policies that defend the Cerrado and its peoples, ”he said.

Photo: Rede Cerrado ©Collection

Already Maria do Socorro Teixeira Lima, babassu coconut breaker and general coordinator of the Cerrado Network, the last two years have been essential for the institutional strengthening of the Cerrado Network. For her, now, it is necessary to expand the work with the base communities. “This is why the continuity of the Cerrado Network is so important. We rescued her, restructured her. I leave this message to our partners. ” Rose Mary Araújo, from Women in Action of the Pantanal (Mupan), considers the support given to the Cerrado Network to be essential. “There are no landscapes without people and Rede Cerrado really needs this support, especially now that we are reestablished. In the political field there is no other organization like Rede Cerrado ”, he said. César Victor do Espírito Santo, from the Pró-Natureza Foundation (Funatura) said that CEPF has filled a gap in the Cerrado, as it has historically been a biome that receives few resources for conservation projects. “The strengthening of the Cerrado Network is very important in getting the Cerrado's agenda forward. Not only of traditional peoples and communities, but also those related to to biodiversity conservation ', completed.

The main objective of the project supported by the CEPF Cerrado was to institutionally strengthen the Cerrado Network, in addition to increasing its incidence. The main action was the holding of the IX Cerrado Peoples' Meeting and Fair, which brought together in the federal capital, Brasilia, more than 500 representatives of traditional peoples and communities throughout the Cerrado and about seven thousand people from society in general. In addition to exchanging experiences and discussing strategies for keeping the Cerrado standing, they were able to exhibit products from sociobiodiversity and show a little of the cultural and gastronomic diversity for about seven thousand people who attended the event.

I Cerrado Network Territories Workshop held in November 2018. Photo: ©Thays Puzzi/Rede Cerrado Collection

Another project that allowed the Cerrado Network to expand its actions was the DGM / FIP Program (Dedicated Grant Mechanism for Indigenous People and Local Communities - Forest Investment Fund) of the World Bank.

For Kátia Favilla, Executive Secretary of the Cerrado Network, these last two years have been essential to reinforce the Cerrado Network's articulation and animation processes. “For the next few years, the biggest challenge will be the organizations acting together in a scenario with little financial resources and dismantling public environmental policies and guaranteeing the rights of traditional peoples and communities. Only with unity of entities and the strengthening of communities In their localities, besides a strong base work, we can guarantee the existence of the Cerrado and its peoples, ”said Favilla.

Cerrado Network and CEPF Cerrado

THE Cerrado Network counts with support from CEPF Cerrado to execute the project “Network strengthened, Cerrado conserved”, which aims to broaden the political impact of the Network on the elaboration, implementation and monitoring of public policies promoting sustainable development, respecting the rights of family farmers, peoples and traditional communities.


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

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For an isolated community in Brazil, knowledge is power

The Kalunga community is using mapping data to defend their land and traditional way of life.

translated from text published by Marsea Nelson, Senior Communications Manager, Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund 

 

Several hundred years ago, in Brazil, fugitive slave groups established communities & #8211; known as quilombos. Many of these communities were destroyed, but in a remote mountainous region of Goiás, some 8,000 of their descendants & #8211; the people Kalunga & #8211; it continues a traditional lifestyle largely isolated from the modern world.

Today, however, this modern world is forming for this community. The Kalungas found themselves fighting for both their culture and their ancestral land, which lies within the impressive region of Veadeiros Plateau (Goiás, Brazil), which is part of hot spot in Cerrado biodiversity.

The Kalunga are mainly Catholic. However, some converted to neo-Pentecostalism, which brought some differences with community members who continue to hold traditional beliefs.

Community children learn about local biodiversity. Photo: © Quilombo Kalunga Association Collection

In addition, younger Kalungas leave the territory to study or work. “When they return, they bring musical influences, outside dancing and new habits,” said Vilmar Souza Costa, president of the Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK). “They also bring a new vision of how to relate to the land, wanting to apply new technologies to cultivate it and fight pests, which are more appropriate for agribusiness.”

At threats to Kalunga lands they include imminent plans for the construction of a small hydroelectric plant and consistent pressure from mining companies, as well as an increase in land used for agriculture.

Pasture areas have grown over the years and open areas are already taking over the territory, Costa said. He also noted that populations of many species of local biodiversity & #8211; including tapirs, armadillos, rheas and fish & #8211; decreased.

The project field team. Photo: © Quilombo Kalunga Association Collection

Recognizing these challenges, the community established the Quilombo Kalunga Association in 1999 to represent and defend their interests.

In 2013, the idea of using the geoprocessing to better understand families living in the region and territory, documenting precisely what Kalunga lands housed, where they were most vulnerable and where there were the best opportunities to implement tourism.

Finding funding for the project, however, proved challenging. Government funds failed and efforts to find another donor did not materialize until five years later, when CEPF granted the Association its first Donation of US$ 216,600.00.

& #8220; In the Cerrado, working with traditional peoples and communities is an important part of our strategy & #8221; said Peggy Poncelet, CEPF grant director. #8220; Not every donor is equipped to provide the kind of technical support that a developing organization such as AQK requires, but CEPF is.

Kalunga Territory. Photo: ©P. Poncelet / CEPF Collection

With funding finally in place, a specialist was hired by AQK to train 24 young Kalungas in GIS and Open Data Kit, which is a data collection toolkit that does not require an internet connection. They then began to systematically gather socioeconomic information about local residents of the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage.

The work was not easy & #8211; The team faced heavy rains and bad roads. Sometimes they would go to hard to reach places, only to find that the family was not at home. This fieldwork was a complicated process, but, according to Costa, the young people took on with “enthusiasm and joy”.

The information collected in the survey is being useful on many fronts. The state sanitation company will use the data to improve water supply and sanitation in the community. Information about which families have dogs and chickens will be used by the Department of Health to help fight Chagas disease, which can cause serious health complications. Meanwhile, a federal organization is using data on land cultivation and animal husbandry to provide farmers with more efficient technical assistance.

Vilmar Costa, president of AQK, spoke to the community about the 19 endangered species occurring in the Kalunga Territory. Photo: © Quilombo Kalunga Association Collection

Awareness raising is another essential component of the CEPF funded project. Presentations about 19 endangered species found in the region were widely reported in local schools and municipalities. & #8220; Participating students and teachers posted photos and comments on their social networks, which eventually led to large-scale knowledge of the 19 species of Chapada dos Veadeiros & #8221 ;, said Costa. AQK also made presentations during community meetings and distributed calendars and banners describing local biodiversity and how to protect it.

AQK is now working on creating a online platform which will allow each family to update their own information.

The project was also reported locally by the The Brazilian Report and Eyeing The Ruralists. Recently, the portal G1 Nature has published a series of articles and videos about the Kalunga community.

Read the original text of this article, which is available in English at site CEPF.

About Quilombo Kalunga Association and CEPF Cerrado

The Quilombo Kalunga Association is a non-profit, non-profit civil organization founded in October 1999. It is formed by the Kalunga Associations of Cavalcante, Monte Alegre, Teresina and Engenho II, as well as Epotecampo. She represents the largest quilombo territory in Brazil, with 262 thousand hectares of land. The Association promotes the defense of interest of all communities formed by residents of the Kalunga Historical and Cultural Heritage Site (SHPCK), scattered between the municipalities of Cavalcante, Monte Alegre de Goiás and Teresina de Goiás, and represent them in all instances. legal and administrative

The project “Use of Geoprocessing in the Management of the Kalunga Historical and Cultural Heritage Site - SHPCK”, fostered by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF, from the acronym in English to Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fundand with support from Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB)The project aims to know in depth the reality of Kalunga communities, use geoprocessing technology to map the territory in detail, promote SHPCK occupation in a more sustainable way and make Kalunga internationally recognized as advocates of biodiversity conservation. .


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

Field research seeks to value the ways of life of traditional peoples and communities of the Cerrado

by Bruno Santiago, Communication Advisor of the National Campaign in Defense of the Cerrado

Between September and October 2019, the National Campaign in Defense of the Cerrado visits Traditional Communities and Peoples of the Mirador-Tables Corridor, located in the states of Maranhão, Piauí and Tocantins. The reason for roaming is the realization of field research from the project ''Network articulation and social participation for the conservation of the Cerrado' ', which is supported by the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) and the International Institute of Education of Brazil (IEB), with the coordination of the ActionAid Brasil.

Jonathan and Jorge, Gamella children from Vão do Vico Indigenous Territory, Santa Filomena, Piauí. In the photo are looking at a monocle with old photos of family members. Photo: ©Andressa Zumpano / ActionAid Collection

Focusing on valuing the lifestyles of Traditional Peoples and Communities and in strengthening the actions of social participation and fight for territorial rights of these groups, the research seeks to support the campaign, its member organizations and populations living in the Brazilian savannah.

Given the adverse socio-environmental conjuncture experienced by the peoples of the earth, forests and waters in any biome of our country, such research becomes even more relevant. That's what explains Gerardo Cerdas Vega, Policy and Program analyst at ActionAid Brazil. "We live in a time when the Cerrado Peoples face widespread violence against their territorial rights and lifestyles, which puts their survival at risk," he emphasizes.

Seu Didi, Melancias territory. Riacho dos Cavalos Community. Gilbués, Piaui. This place was his old house, which today is surrounded by the Dawn Farm. He came in to show us what the community looked like before the houses were destroyed. Photo: ©Andressa Zumpano / ActionAid Collection

From the identification of practices, knowledge and technologies of the visited communities, the research intends to show the relation of the action of these populations with the protection of agrobiodiversity of the territories. '' Any strategy for the defense and conservation of the biome must contemplate the permanence of these guardians. Undoubtedly, their contribution is significant and the research intends to present these benefits, 'says Gerardo.

Another thematic axis of the research is the guarantee of rights tofrom spaces of social participation. The project aims to detect the relevant institutional spaces for community advocacy actions, covering topics such as food and nutrition sovereignty, rural education and social inclusion policies.

In addition to institutional participation spaces, the research will also look at community spaces of organization. '' We note that in the national context spaces for social participation are not always accessible or democratic, especially for traditional peoples and communities. Thus, the project also aims to guarantee subsidies so that communities and peoples can organize and fight for their rights to participate, '' says Vega.

Riozinho, Chupé Community. Santa Filomena, Piaui. Community residents report pesticide contamination in Rio during the winter. That is when the farms use it and with the rains, everything goes down to the rivers of the Communities. Photo: ©Andressa Zumpano / ActionAid Collection

Cerrado Conflicts

One of the communities that received the Campaign field research team was Brejo do Miguel, in the municipality of Gilbués, south of the state of Piauí, a traditional riparian riverine territory. Last week the Pastoral Land Commission (CPT) published public note denouncing the invasion of land grabbers in an area of grass in the stump and loose animals that has been used for about three generations by the community. The fence that had been built by the families of the region was destroyed by seven jagunços with the use of chainsaws.

Unfortunately this kind of conflict is not new to Cerrado and in the Brazilian field. According to CPT data, 118,080 families were involved in land conflicts in 2018, a period that also records that this type of occurrence increased by 3.9% compared to 2017, from 1,431 occurrences to 1,489.

In this context of conflicts, threats and challenges for the resisting close populations, the project's field research & #8220; Network articulation and social participation for the conservation of the Cerrado '' Its objective is to contribute with the availability of information, report and booklet with the fruits of these experiences and learning in the territories.


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Composting in Traditional Generating Communities

by Mario Alberto Santos, via Federal University of Western Bahia (UFOB)

This leaflet is a didactic guide to assist in the installation of a composting model made within the Pedagogical Workshop for treatment of organic solid waste and production of agricultural inputs. This workshop is part of the Project activities. Productive Backyards, Agroecology and Food Safety in the Guará River Valley, São Desidério-BA, which aims to present and disseminate social technologies and sustainable practices for agroecological food production, recovery, soil conservation and treatment of solid organic waste in traditional Geraizeiras communities in western Bahia. Funding for the project is from CEPF Cerrado (Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund), an international fund administered in Brazil by the IEB (International Institute of Education of Brazil), located in Brasília-DF. The technical responsibility lies with the Research and Extension Group: Geographic Education, Dialogue of Knowledge and Cerrado, from the Federal University of Western Bahia (UFOB), and has a partnership with the Bahia Polytechnic School Foundation (FEP-BA), responsible for financial management.

Access the version available at pdf.

 


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Rede Cerrado launches campaign for IX Cerrado Peoples Meeting and Fair

via Cerrado Network

IT'S ALL OR NOTHING!

The campaign for crowdfunding for the IX Meeting and Fair of the Cerrado People is in the air. Do you know why this meeting is important?

Held since 2001, the Cerrado People's Meeting and Fair is a great space for exchanging experiences and articulations in defense of the Biome and its peoples.

The ninth edition of the Meeting is an intense moment of mobilization and integration among various sectors and actors interested in defending the Cerrado and its peoples.

In addition to being a great celebration for the gathering of the diversity of the Cerrado peoples, it has become an important instrument for articulation and strengthening of peoples, as well as being a means of accessibility and discussion of public policies and the commercialization of Peoples' products. from the Cerrado.

For the Living Cerrado: Diversities, Territories and Democracy. This will be the theme of the ninth edition of the Cerrado Peoples Meeting and Fair. Opening on September 11, Cerrado National Day, the Meeting and Fair will be held in Brasilia until September 14 and will be a space for debates, reflections and exchanges of experiences on the reality of the biome and the challenges faced by the peoples and traditional communities that inhabit the Cerrado.

It was to raise complementary funds for the event, that the Cerrado Network launches a crowdfunding campaign so that anyone fighting for the conservation of the Cerrado and its people can collaborate with the construction of the meeting.

Who organizes the Cerrado People Meeting and Fair?

The Cerrado Network! A collective of organizations that brings together 54 formally affiliated organizations and about three hundred organizations participating in the activities of the Network.

We count on your support!

See more details of the collective funding for the IX Cerrado Peoples Meeting and Fair at the link and be part of this great solidarity network: https://benfeitoria.com/encontroefeirapovosdocerrado

 


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Approved in Goiás the first internal regulation of a quilombo in Brazil

Quilombo Kalunga Association Initiative to Model Other Quilombola Communities

by Quilombo Kalunga Association

THE Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK) completed in May the elaboration of the bylaws, a pioneer project at the national level. O rules of procedure for the environmental and territorial management of the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage (SHPCK), for the recognition of Kalunga ancestry and ancestry, and for the exploitation of tourism in the territory. SHPCK is considered the largest quilombo territory in Brazil, with 261,999.69 hectares, and is located in the Chapada dos Veadeiros region, in Goiás.

Vilmar de Souza Costa opens the Assembly of Representatives of the Kalunga Communities to draw up the Rules of Procedure of the Quilombo Kalunga Association. Photo: Maria Lúcia Godinho / AQK Collection.

From March 18 to May 12, 14 assemblies were held, involving all 39 Kalunga communities and attended by over 1,000 people. In these meetings were discussed the most important points that, according to those present, should be contained in the bylaws, were voted by them and approved the contents. In these assemblies the creation of a AQK Representative Council, a collegiate made up of three representatives from each local community, who became part of the board of the Quilombo Kalunga Association.

From May 23rd to 26th, the Assembly of Representatives elected at the community meetings was held at the Kalunga Cavalcante Association. These were moments of intense debate of each article and paragraph, and finally approved.

According Vilmar Souza Costa, president of the Quilombo Kalunga Association, the bylaws are of essential importance to regulate the relations existing within the territory, always respecting the customs, knowledge and traditions of the Kalunga people. “The creation of our regiment is yet another demonstration of the Kalunga people's ability to organize, defend and manage their territory. We collectively and participatively build our own standards, which will be followed by all our people, ”says Costa.

Maria Aparecida Mato, Executive Director of CONAQ - National Coordination of Quilombola Rural Black Communities in Brazil - participated in one of the 14 assemblies and praised the importance of the norms and culture of a quilombola people being put on paper as a written and concrete proof of all that is established. “This is the first quilombo in Brazil to create an internal regiment.. It is an example and a model that will be followed by several other quilombola communities in Brazil, ”he reveals.

Geoprocessing and preservation in assemblies

Another theme of the assemblies was the project “Use of Geoprocessing in the Management of the Historical and Cultural Heritage Site Kalunga & #8211; SHPCK ”, fostered by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF, from the acronym in English to Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) and with support from Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB)The project aims to know in depth the reality of Kalunga communities, use geoprocessing technology to map the territory in detail, promote SHPCK occupation in a more sustainable way and make Kalunga internationally recognized as advocates of biodiversity conservation. .

Representing CEPF / IEB, Michael Jackson speaks on the importance of organizing the Kalunga people to carry out environmental and territorial management. Photo: Maria Lúcia Godinho / AQK Collection.

Since January the survey has been carried out and the socioeconomic register SHPCK residents, with the goal of participation of all 1,500 quilombola families. After the survey, the field surveys will be associated with the cartographic base and the thematic mapping performed through geoprocessing and remote sensing. There will also be a cadastral survey of mining activities, illegal logging and predatory fishing, and tourist attractions.

The assemblies also focused on the mobilization of quilombola families on the importance of biodiversity conservation all over the territory. For this, they were made 4,000 calendars, which were delivered to Kalunga houses, as well as people and strategic locations in the municipalities of Alto Paraíso, Cavalcante, Campos Belos, Monte Alegre de Goiás and Teresina de Goiás. Banners were also made, set in all municipal, state and private schools. in the five municipalities.

According to the previous survey made by the Association, there are 19 locally threatened species found in the region. Conservation target species were prioritized according to the degree of threat criterion, focused on species facing extremely high risk of extinction in nature, requiring urgent conservation actions.

About Quilombo Kalunga Association

The Quilombo Kalunga Association is a non-profit, non-profit civil organization founded in October 1999. It is formed by the Kalunga Associations of Cavalcante, Monte Alegre, Teresina and Engenho II, as well as Epotecampo. She represents the largest quilombo territory in Brazil, with 262 thousand hectares of land. The Association promotes the defense of interest of all communities formed by residents of the Kalunga Historical and Cultural Heritage Site (SHPCK), scattered between the municipalities of Cavalcante, Monte Alegre de Goiás and Teresina de Goiás, and represent them in all instances. legal and administrative

More information:

Phone: (62) 3494-1062

Email: aqkalunga@gmail.com

Facebook gives Aqk.


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Training in Cerrado seedling production brings together traditional peoples and communities in Mato Grosso do Sul

In November, the community of Aldeia Brejão promoted a practice in Cerrado seedling production, through the project Seedling Nursery for Agroforestry Production in Aldeia Brejão. This project receives support from Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF, Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) and Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB).

The training workshop involved representatives from the Hanaiti Yomo'omo Association (AHY), the Ecology and Action NGO (ECOA), São Miguel quilombola community, Água Branca Village, Taboquinha Village, Rural Extension Agency, Angelina Vicente Indigenous State School, Municipal School Eugênio de Souza and representatives of the Cerrado Production, Research and Training Center (Ceppec), located in the Andalucia settlement, in Nioaque / MS.

The project Seedling nursery for agroforestry production in Aldeia Brejãowhich runs Hanaiti Yomomo Association (AHY), aims to include indigenous peoples in the community development process, ensuring a sustainable alternative in food security, the use of new social technologies, sustainable use of land and plant species in the Cerrado, as well as adding value and generating income through agricultural and extractivist means. One of the main components of this project is to train community members in agroecological transition and agroforestry systems, as well as in the production of fruits of plant species of the Cerrado. THE Training Workshop for Production of Seedlings of Native Cerrado Species It took place between November 30 and December 1, 2018 and was taught by Dr. Zefa Valdivina Pereira (UNICAMP). According to Alexandro Souza, project manager, & #8220; the two days of workshop were extremely rewarding work days & #8221 ;.

Want to know the other projects supported by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF, Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) and International Institute of Education of Brazil (IEB)? Access our site or subscribe to our electronic bulletin.

Seedling Nursery for Agroforestry Production in Aldeia Brejão, Training Workshop for Production of Seedlings of Native Cerrado Species, November 2018.
Seedling Nursery for Agroforestry Production in Aldeia Brejão, Training Workshop for Production of Seedlings of Native Cerrado Species, November 2018.
Seedling Nursery for Agroforestry Production in Aldeia Brejão, Training Workshop for Production of Seedlings of Native Cerrado Species, November 2018.

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Mamede Institute and WWF-Brazil promote training in ecotourism with MS communities

 

Photo: Aryanne Amaral / IEB

 

* Community-Based Ecotourism is an action that contributes to raising family income and conserving natural resources.

It can be another source of family income, conserve natural resources, and delight people about caring for the land and nature are the goals of a project that Mamede Institute and WWF-Brazil develop today with the Canaã Settlement, in Rock that is 80 km far from the capital of Mato Grosso do Sul. Settlers are learning that simple living and caring for nature generate interest from tourists seeking rural experiences. In the settlement there are several natural and cultural attractions, with the possibility of the tourist to visit the fields; monitor the production of dairy cattle; visit the Santo Antonio Hill - where believers make pilgrimages and devotions; various water sources; natural environments with Cerrado vegetation, gallery forests and seasonal forests, and abundant wildlife. Typical foods, garden produce and family farms are also offered, as well as breads, milk and cheese.

For all of this to work, however, the community needs to be well prepared and organized, so the importance of residents' training and engagement courses.

And it is this kind of initiative & #8211; organize the community to offer community ecotourism services & #8211; that Instituto Mamede is doing in partnership with WWF-Brasil, through the project “Sustainable Municipalities protecting the cradle of Cerrado waters and the headwaters of the Pantanal” supported by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF, Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) and Brazilian International Institute of Education (IEB).

Don Eaton's WWF-Brazil explained that “the project, Sustainable Municipalities, seeks to promote economic alternatives that are environmentally sustainable for rural communities, contributing to income generation, strengthening the local economy and maintaining essential environmental services for production areas, rural communities and regional biodiversity. "

Continuous work

The work with Community-Based Ecotourism in the Canaan Settlement The participation of 23 community members has been built through a dialogue process since 2017, culminating in the first training module in July this year, based on Quilombola Community Furnas da Boa Sorte, located in the municipality of Corguinho (130 km from Campo Grande), Mato Grosso do Sul. There, the training has been developed since 2015 and, this year, the second module took place in February with the participation of 43 people.

Simone Mamede and Maristela Benites from Mamede Institute, have the partnership of several institutions such as the State University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UEMS), the Graduate Program in Environment and Regional Development of UNIDERP and Mato Grosso do Sul Tourism Foundation - FUNDTUR-MS. Thus, experience and responsibilities are shared in order to inspire and ensure the construction of more sustainable territories that perceive local-based tourism as an alternative for better land use and biodiversity conservation. In addition to encouraging research and extension on this topic and investment in training and structuring tourism in the state, they said.

Participatory methodologies such as open space, spoken map, participatory diagnosis, lecture and field practices have been used to conduct the training. The courses are divided into three modules: I) Planning and Sustainability; II) Environmental Education and Script Formatting and; III) Entrepreneurship and Marketing.

According to Simone Mamede of the Mamede Institute, “the activity has been conducted with great care and dedication. All monitors have undergone training and the application of the modules has been evaluated and monitored. Dialogue, perception and follow-up by both community members and other actors are frequent and enriching actions, which have added a lot in the formation process. Protagonism, empowerment, belonging, participation and social identity are the structuring themes that underlie the actions and each training module ”.

As a result of Quilombola Community Furnas da Boa Sorte It has already received some groups of tourists and has realized the importance of expanding the range of activities with the tourism potential. In this sense, the women, which represented more than 50% of the people who attended the last training, has mobilized to create a non-governmental organization that represents the community's women's core.

This second semester will include the installation of community-based Ecotourism interpretation and signage boards and by 2019 new workshops on specific topics are also planned.

“Community-based ecotourism has proven to be not only an income alternative for these communities, but a way of transforming people and recognizing the beauty and simplicity of everyday life. A learning about the culture of peace, living and living, a continuous and collective construction for sustainability ”, concluded Mamede.

* Text provided by WWF-Brasil and Instituto Mamede

Furnas Quilombola Community of Good Luck, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Don Eaton / WWF Brazil
Furnas Quilombola Community of Good Luck, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Instituto Mamede
Furnas Quilombola Community of Good Luck, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Instituto Mamede
Furnas Quilombola Community of Good Luck, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Don Eaton / WWF Brazil
Furnas Quilombola Community of Good Luck, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Instituto Mamede
Furnas Quilombola Community of Good Luck, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Instituto Mamede
Settlement Canaan, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Mamede Institute
Settlement Canaan, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Mamede Institute
Canaan Settlement, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Don Eaton / WWF Brasil
Canaan Settlement, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Don Eaton / WWF Brasil
Canaan Settlement, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Don Eaton / WWF Brasil
Settlement Canaan, Mato Grosso do Sul. © Mamede Institute

 


The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of the French Development Agency, Conservation International, the European Union, Global Environmental Management, the Government of Japan, the MacArthur Foundation and the World Bank. A key goal is to ensure that civil society is involved in biodiversity conservation.

 

 

Kalunga community gains ownership of areas important to its territory

Kalunga Community / © Ion David

 

On June 6 at 10 am, Attorney General Dr. Luiz Cesar Kimura, representing Governor Zé Eliton and the state of Goiás, accompanied by Dr. Vavá, handed the Deed of Grant of Real Right of Use to the President gives Quilombo Kalunga Association (AQK), Vilmar Souza Costa, from the following areas:

PROPERTY NAME

AREA (ha)

Gleba Vacant Kid

3.682,5639

Gleba Vacant Gap of Souls

57.343,4438

Serra da Contenda I Biological Reserve

14.207,0000

TOTAL

75.233,0077

The ceremony was attended by a large number of Kalungas, the Boards of the Associations, the Judge of the Cavalcante County Dr. Pedro Piazzalunga Cesario Pereira, the Promoter Dr. Úrsula Catarina Pereira Pinto, the Mayor Rui Alves Maciel and the Councilors Kalungas Iron Moreira Dias and Salviano dos Santos Rosa. The joy of the Kalunga people during the solemnity was very great.

This conquest of the tenure of these three areas is extremely important for the consolidation of the territory of the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage (SHPCK), fruit of the struggle of the Quilombo Kalunga Association. The communities of Teresina, Monte Alegre and Cavalcante received an entourage from the government of the state of Goiás that handed over the land use deed. Now Kalunga territory has these areas, which add up to 75,233,0077 hectares14,000 hectares belong to the Serra da Contenda I Biological Reserve.

SHPCK has approximately 39 regions which may be called communities, where more than 1,500 families. Kalungas have lived in the mountain ranges for approximately 300 years and have a harmonious relationship with the environment. The community also carries very strong culture and historical tradition in its people through crafts such as ceramics, weaving, embroidery and the production of home remedies.

Through the project “Use of Geoprocessing in the Management of the Kalunga Historical Site and Cultural Heritage”, The Quilombo Kalunga Association with the support of CEPF Cerrado (Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund) implement the improvement and consolidation of SHPCK's environmental and territorial management through Geographic Information System (GIS) as a tool for permanent territorial management, as well as the sustainable use of natural resources, aiming at guaranteeing the improvement in the quality of life for all residents and for future generations.  Access the link to know more about this initiative!

2018 has been a year of consolidating countless victories of the Kalunga people!

 

Kalunga community at the solemnity of the delivery of the Deed for the granting of real use of the areas
Kalunga community at the solemnity of the delivery of the Deed for the granting of real use of the areas
Representatives of the Kalunga people and the state of Goiás.
Representatives of the Kalunga people and the state of Goiás.
Representatives of the Kalunga people and the state of Goiás.
Representatives of the Kalunga people and the state of Goiás.

 

Socio-environmental organizations want to base Cerrado conservation on presidential candidate programs

 

Proposed national strategy for the biome also includes the defense of the territorial rights of the peoples and traditional communities of the region. Guidelines will be delivered to candidates for President of the Republic

Brasilia, June 4, 2018 - O Cerrado It is more than the world's granary for Brazilian agricultural production, it is also the water tank of Brazil. The statement by former Federal District Secretary for the Environment, André Lima, shows the need for the next President of the Republic to review the form of occupation of the biome, which has suffered increasing devastation in recent years. “To this day no president has considered the Cerrado as a biome it is,” Lima emphasized.

In order to reconcile the necessary actions for the economic, social and environmental development of the country, six social and environmental organizations met to promote the seminar. “National Strategy for the Cerrado”, to be delivered to all candidates for president by August this year. The seminar will take place on June 5 - World Environment Day - and will be held by Commission for Environment and Sustainable Development (CMADS), in plenary 2, of Annex II, of the Chamber of Deputies in Brasilia.

The proposal to be presented to the presidential candidate has three axes. The first is the conservation and recovery of the Cerrado. This guideline includes the implementation of environmental legislation, the strengthening of protected areas and the goal of zero net deforestation in the Cerrado, safeguarding the particularities of family farmers, peoples and traditional communities. The second is the guarantee of territorial rights and access to natural resources by traditional populations and extractive communities. The third axis is the most challenging: integrating agricultural development with the conservation and integrity of the biome to ensure sustainable development for the environment. “Today, the Cerrado is a region seen only for the development of agribusiness and livestock”, points out André Lima.

“The Cerrado is a spring region of the Amazon, São Francisco, Tocantins, North / Northeast Atlantic basin, East Atlantic basin and the Paraná / Paraguay river basin,” explains the environmentalist.

The National Strategy Coordination for the Cerrado is made up of six socio-environmental organizations: the institutes Society, Population and Nature (ISPN), International Education of Brazil (IEB), Amazonian Environmental Research (IPAM), Socio-Environmental (ISA), Center of Life (ICV) and the World Fund for Nature (WWF-Brazil). The seminar will be supported by Climate and Land Use Alliance (CLUA) and with resources from Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF).

Cerrado threatened

The Cerrado is the second largest biome in Brazil and houses 40% of the Brazilian population. They are family farmers, communities and traditional people - quilombolas, Gerizeiros (northern Minas Gerais), babassu coconut breakers, indigenous peoples, among others - there are 216 indigenous lands and 83 ethnic groups in its interior.

As for water, it houses the Guarani aquifer - the second largest underground reservoir in the world, besides the Bambuí and Urucuia aquifers. Part of the Southeast depends on rainwater and springs in the Cerrado.

The Brazilian Cerrado is one of the most endangered savannas on the planet. It currently has only 50% of its original plant cover. Only 5% of its area is protected by fully protected conservation units.

Speaking of devastation, it is a threat to a biodiversity-rich biome. Some studies report more than 12,000 cataloged species of native flora.

Regarding fauna, about 250 species of mammals live in the Cerrado, along with a rich birdlife, with 856 species recorded. The diversity of 800 fish species, 262 reptile species and 204 amphibian species is high and relevant for maintaining Cerrado ecosystems.

For more information about the event visit the website CMADS It's this one link.

 

 

IEB, CEPF and CI / GEF mission visits Cerrado conservation projects in Mato Grosso do Sul

In this month of April, the International Institute of Education of Brazil / CEPF Cerrado received a visit from the CEPF International and Conservation International / GEF for a visit to projects that are already running in the areas of Cerrado of Mato Grosso do Sul.

The projects were approved by CEPF Cerrado First Call 2016 and are executed by Hanaiti Yomo'omo Association (AHY), ECOA, Neotropic Foundation of Brazil and WWF-Brazil and are developing work aimed at restoration, training, territorial management, public policy, protected areas and agroecology.

THE AHY and the ECOA They work with the strengthening of communities, the first seeking the inclusion of indigenous people and the second with rural settlers, by adding value and generating income through the Cerrado's agricultural and agro-extractive products. In addition, ECOA is following a vegetation restoration process started in 2016 in 15 areas (totaling approximately 22 ha). THE Neotropic Foundation of Brazil and WWF-Brazil seek to strengthen CONDEMAs to support local decisions that contribute to the conservation of the Cerrado and to the achievement of global biodiversity conservation goals. In addition, WWF-Brazil aims to promote participatory municipal land use planning and develop community-based programs for ecological restoration.

Know the details of each project in the site of CEPF Cerrado.

Quilombola Territory in Corguinho, MS.
Seedling nursery in the Aldeia Brejão indigenous community in Nioaque, MS.
Cerrado areas under restoration in Miranda, MS. Aryanne Amaral / IEB Collection
Teams from IEB, CEPF, CI, ECOA, Neotropic Foundation of Brazil and WWF-Brazil.

Photos: Aryanne Amaral / IEB

Indigenous and Quilombolas Discuss Project Actions Supported by CEPF Fund

Both indigenous people and quilombolas participated in the last week of the presentation of the three projects supported by the CEPF Fund (Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund), in Portuguese Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund, to be implemented in the territory of the Sertão Veredas Peruaçu Mosaic. The event took place through the partnership between WWF-Brazil, the Pro-Nature Foundation (Funatura) and the Peruaçu Valley Family and Agro-Extractive Farmers Cooperative (CooPeruaçu), all covered by CEPF investments. The objective was to disseminate information that shows the interfaces of the three proposals and highlight the intention to develop joint actions.

News posted from WWF Brasil website. See the full story on here.

The event was held by WWF-Brasil, Funatura and CooPeruaçu, to disseminate information that shows the interfaces of the three proposals and highlight the intention to develop joint actions.
© Kolbe Soares / WWF-Brasil

 

Organizations develop online platform for mapping Indigenous and Community Lands

Thirteen of the world's leading land rights organizations have developed the LandMark (Global Platform of Indigenous And Community Lands), which is the first online, interactive and global platform for mapping indigenous and community lands, providing local and national level data. It also tracks critical information about the legal security of these lands, allowing users to monitor the status and effectiveness of national land laws around the world.

The global platform is intended to help indigenous peoples and communities protect their land rights and secure tenure of their land. THE Landmark It currently provides information on two scales, community level and national level, allowing users to compare land tenure status between and within countries.

The LandMark platform can be accessed through the following link: http://www.landmarkmap.org/